Author Topic: Traditional Mayonnaise  (Read 16626 times)

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Satya

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Traditional Mayonnaise
« on: July 20, 2008, 05:07:55 am »
Here is a video demo of the mayonnaise-making process.  You'll want to size your browser according to how you want to view it.

I fail to mention it in the clip, but always use extra virgin olive oil, preferrably organic.  I use the Greek Iliada organic.  I should have stuck with a couple egg yolks so that it wouldn't have taken me forever and a day to whisk, and I could have produced a much thicker product.  However, those wishing to minimize oils in their diet may appreciate a more egg-rich sauce, which will be thinner.

Sorry about the blasted phone rings!  THAT won't happen in the future.  I cut out the last couple of those annoying rings anyway.  Let me know if you can't see this, which I don't think will be a problem.

http://www.traditionaltx.us/images/mayo.avi
« Last Edit: October 27, 2008, 07:32:02 pm by Satya »

xylothrill

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2008, 11:33:12 pm »
Awesome! I just might try that and make some raw tuna salad out of it.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2008, 03:46:38 am »
I've made my own mayonnaise with a similar technique a few times and there seems to be something missing for me. I suppose what I'm after is the flavor of all the bad stuff in commercially made mayonnaise. Also there is a type of mayonnaise made in Japan I believe called tobiko that Japanese restaurants use for their spicy tuna sushi and their kani and spicy seafood salads. That stuff is my absolute favorite. My favorite flavors by far are spicy and creamy/fatty; something between creamy mayonnaise and hot sauce would be my favorite condiment if it existed.

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2008, 04:36:24 am »
I've made my own mayonnaise with a similar technique a few times and there seems to be something missing for me. I suppose what I'm after is the flavor of all the bad stuff in commercially made mayonnaise. Also there is a type of mayonnaise made in Japan I believe called tobiko that Japanese restaurants use for their spicy tuna sushi and their kani and spicy seafood salads. That stuff is my absolute favorite. My favorite flavors by far are spicy and creamy/fatty; something between creamy mayonnaise and hot sauce would be my favorite condiment if it existed.

Tobiko is flying fish eggs.  Mayonnaise started off a few centuries ago exactly like I made it.  Since I havn't eaten the commercial crap that's put in a jar for at least 2 decades (sorry, but I am a bit of a gourmet), I would have no clue as to the flavor you are trying to achieve.  Olive oil can be overpowering, and you could substitute bland sunflower oil instead, but it is inferior and full of PUFAs.  Add some honey to it and I bet you'd be in business.

Usually, it will get super thick too.  I just foolishly went for too many eggs, and the humidity level was pretty high.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2008, 04:51:05 am by Satya »

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2008, 04:50:46 am »
I just need to experiment I guess. So do you think that "tobiko mayonnaise" is mayo with flying fish eggs in it? That certainly makes sense because there is definitely fish eggs in the kani salad sauce.

Anyone know how to get raw unsalted fish eggs in USA? Usually at Japanese places they use salted fish eggs, and then there's caviar but I'm guessing that's cooked. I wouldn't mind raw lightly salted with sea salt either.

Thanks again for all the help Satya.

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2008, 06:25:46 am »
Yeah, experiment.  And when you find something you like, please share it.  I am like the tides when it comes to raw eating - sometimes high, sometimes low.  And it's a 100 freakin' degrees outside, so you know, everyone in my house can eat raw, afaic. 

The fish roe: you can buy roe carpelin fish frozen at the Asian market.  They are loaded with eggs, without any adulteration.  I bet you could scoop them out and eat.  You might even find them fresh, depending on your locale.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2008, 06:27:51 am by Satya »

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2008, 06:43:52 am »
Here's the chickens, whose eggs have such orange yolks from all day in the sun, eating a natural diet, and frolicking with poor kitties who must compete for scraps.

« Last Edit: July 21, 2008, 06:46:22 am by Satya »

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2008, 06:49:18 am »
Nice chickens!

Nothing beats the taste of good, high-quality, farm-fresh pastured eggs!
I can only get them in very limited supply from my friend's girlfriend's mother, but man are they good!
Otherwise I get eggs from a brand called The Country Hen at my supermarket, which are very high quality compared with normal supermarket eggs, but still don't compare to the farm-fresh ones!

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2008, 07:59:11 am »
And try as the veg crowd might to claim that chickens are vegetarians (look at popular health food store egg cartons), chickens are omnivores.  They love meat, especially in winter.  Currently, our compost bin has 6 inches of scratched dirt around an otherwise grassy surface.  Why?  This is bug season.  And so I throw out veg matter, which attracts bugs, which attracts chickens.  Talk about harmony!

I think that photo was shot in late winter when meat bits were being thrown out.  Thus the presence of Stormy kitty, who has been trained not to eat the chickens, but nonetheless likes a raw meat treat, just as we all do!  (He sure wasn't eating anything else with the birds!) 

You are in the South, yes?  Do you enjoy any country living?

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise - from where does the voice come?
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2008, 08:14:00 am »
BTW, who can guess (who doesn't already know (be honest)), based on my voice in the video: From which US state and general region do I hail?  International members might still have a shot at it.  I do not sound too Texan, and I have lived in many places.  However, the longest residence is still that of my upbringing, by far.  Where is that, within 300 miles?
« Last Edit: July 21, 2008, 08:28:14 am by Satya »

xylothrill

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise - from where does the voice come?
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2008, 12:22:58 pm »
BTW, who can guess (who doesn't already know (be honest)), based on my voice in the video: From which US state and general region do I hail?  International members might still have a shot at it.  I do not sound too Texan, and I have lived in many places.  However, the longest residence is still that of my upbringing, by far.  Where is that, within 300 miles?

I already know but I expected you'd have picked up at least a bit of a Texan accent, which you have not.

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise - from where does the voice come?
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2008, 09:32:01 pm »
I already know but I expected you'd have picked up at least a bit of a Texan accent, which you have not.

Well, lemme tell ya honey, I can put on a thick, sweet Texas drawl anytime.  In fact, I tend to when speaking with other Texan natives.  When talking with my grandmaster, I start doing a broken English with him, lol.

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2008, 10:21:17 pm »
You are in the South, yes?  Do you enjoy any country living?

Haha, country living... not exactly.

The place where my parents live (where I'm at right now for the summer) is a picture-perfect definition of suburban sprawl. In fact, I remember hearing a couple years ago that it was the fastest growing town in the US. Not sure if it still is though.

Then for the rest of the year, I go to school in Charleston, which is a beautiful historic city.
However, before I transferred, I went to Clemson, and there was plenty of bona-fide countryness there!

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2008, 09:44:55 pm »
Kyle,

You might want to inquire at your local health food stores about this brand of mayonnaise from France.  It is in the refrigerator/deli section as it is not heated.  It contains the following ingredients: sunflower oil, egg yolk, mustard, (mustard seeds, vinegar, water, sea salt), white wine vinegar, salt, lemon.  The brand is "Delouis fils" and is in a clear container (thus a mayo color).  They have garlic and Caesar varieties too ... maybe others.  It's going to cost you probably 3x more than if you made the same thing yourself with comparable ingredients, but you might like it.  I buy it in a pinch when the hens aren't laying.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2008, 02:11:48 am »
Kyle,

You might want to inquire at your local health food stores about this brand of mayonnaise from France.  It is in the refrigerator/deli section as it is not heated.  It contains the following ingredients: sunflower oil, egg yolk, mustard, (mustard seeds, vinegar, water, sea salt), white wine vinegar, salt, lemon.  The brand is "Delouis fils" and is in a clear container (thus a mayo color).  They have garlic and Caesar varieties too ... maybe others.  It's going to cost you probably 3x more than if you made the same thing yourself with comparable ingredients, but you might like it.  I buy it in a pinch when the hens aren't laying.

Thanks Satya. It sounds to me like you're from California.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2008, 04:09:44 am »
Oh and I found the brand of Japanese mayo that is my favorite. It's called "Kewpie." Online I found advice to make a similar tasting mayo saying that a neutral tasting oil works best. Unfortunately those are also the less healthy oils such as canola and safflower.

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #16 on: July 25, 2008, 04:47:26 am »
Thanks Satya. It sounds to me like you're from California.

Ding ding ding!  You win!  Home of the OP pro surfing championships.

xylothrill

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #17 on: July 25, 2008, 09:53:48 am »
Especially the intonation of these words: "just go by instinct. You don't need to measure. You don't need to worry about.. whatever.." it's VERY Californian!  ;) 

So what does Kyle get? A gift card for mayo?  ;D

Craig

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #18 on: July 31, 2008, 10:51:32 am »
Oh and I found the brand of Japanese mayo that is my favorite. It's called "Kewpie." Online I found advice to make a similar tasting mayo saying that a neutral tasting oil works best. Unfortunately those are also the less healthy oils such as canola and safflower.

Sunflower is neutral too, and better (according to Sally Fallon and Mary Enig).  So what's the recipe?  And is that pronounced Kyoopee or kyoopie?

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2008, 12:00:42 pm »
I think it's the first pronunciation Satya.

The thing about mayo and myself is that when I love it I really love it, and when I don't then I don't like it at all. For instance any lite mayo I've ever tried, or even regular Hellmann's (which is ok but I was never thrilled with) doesn't appeal to me much. But the seriously fatty stuff they use at delis and this Japanese stuff I just love so much. So I'm a little worried it's the unhealthy fats combined with msg and stuff like that which I'm enjoying and not the "real" mayonnaise flavor.

Kind of like if you like McDonald's hamburgers it doesn't mean you like beef, because those things are pretty far removed from real beef.

But I'll try it.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2008, 12:05:28 pm »
Here's the text from the page I found http://www.justhungry.com/2006/02/basics_mayonnai.html

I bolded a bulleted point at the very bottom which tells you how to recreate the Japanese style Mayonnaise.

If there is one food that has defeated me over the years, it's mayonnaise. For the longest time I couldn't figure out how to make a good mayonnaise. I read the instructions in numerous cookbooks. I watched the Good Eats episode about it. I tried using a food processor, a stick blender, whipping by hand.

Every time, I'd end up with a mess - eggy globs floating in a sea of oil, sort of like a Chinese eggdrop soup. Eggdrop soup is delicious, but eggdrop oil is not.

Why would I even bother to make mayonnaise? All I can say is that once you've tried homemade mayonnaise made with real fresh eggs, the store bought stuff would just not be enough. Even my favorite commercial mayonnaise in the world, Kewpie Mayonnaise, pales in comparison.

But finally and completely by accident, I discovered how to make mayonnaise that is creamy, eggy, and smooth without fail.

So if you have had mayonnaise problems too, read on....

Technorati Tags: mayo, mayonnaise
The ingredients

You will need:

    * 2 large, fresh, organic or pasteurized eggs. The egg is not cooked so it must be certifiably fresh and/or pasteurized. I use date-stamped eggs, or the fresh ones I can buy from a local farm.
    * 1 to 1 1/2 cups of oil. The choice of oil varies based on what you intend the mayo to be used for. Normally I use a flavorless oil such as peanut or safflower, but for making a mayo for dipping vegetables in, or as a basis for aioli (garlic mayonnaise) I use either a mixture of safflower and extra virgin olive oil, or olive oil alone. If you use all olive oil, the predominant taste in your mayo will be olive oil. My usual preference is for the egg flavor to be more forthcoming.
    * 1-2 Tbs. lemon juice or white wine vinegar. Again, the amount of acidic liquid you add will influence the flavor of your mayo.
    * 1/2 to 1 tsp. salt, to taste.
    * Optional: 1/4 Tbs mustard powder, OR 1 Tbs. mustard. Again...the type of mustard and the amount will also change the flavor. I actually prefer no mustard at all, or just a smidgen of mustard powder.

The equipment

    * I prefer to make mayonnaise with an electric whisk. You can use a food processor or a stick blender, but I find that both of those methods make a mayo that is very stiff. Whisks seem to make a lighter mayo. A hand whisk would work too, but electric is easier. The hand-cranked type of beater will not work because it requires two hands. One hand for your beater of choice, one hand for the squeeze bottle, is what you will need.
    * 2 small to medium sized bowls.
    * A moistened kitchen towel, to place under the bowls to keep them from moving about. This is critical since you will be using both hands as mentioned above.
    * A plastic squeeze bottle with a small nozzle. Mine is a $1 'dressing bottle' that I bought at the almost-everything-for-$1 store in Japantown in San Francisco.


    * Optional equipment: an iPod. You'll be standing around drizzling oil s-l-o-w-l-y for some time so the iPod will keep away the boredom. (You may choose to substitute another MP3 player.) For maximum effect use noise-cancelling headphones to shut out most of the egg beater racket.

The procedure

Put your chosen oil into the plastic squeeze bottle. My pink capped bottle just happens to hold exactly 1.5 cups.

Separate the egg yolks from the whites; discard the whites or keep them for something else. Put the two egg yolks in the two bowls - one yolk per bowl. Why? You will see.

Add about 1/2 tsp of salt and the optional mustard to one of the bowls.

Start beating at low speed. In short order the egg yolk will look rather sticky. Add the oil, drop by drop, to the egg yolk mixture. And I do mean drop by drop. This is really critical to creating the emulsion that is the basis of mayonnaise.

Keep adding the oil, drop by drop.

After a while you'll get tired and bored and start thinking, it's safe to add the oil faster now, and you'll squeeze that bottle a bit harder. It's human nature to do so, and besides, the books tell you that you can add the oil faster once the emulsion has started. Now, if you are lucky your mayo will still be smooth and cohesive. But in my case this is rare. Usually it separates into that icky eggdrop oil:

This is where the second yolk comes in. Transfer your whisk or beater to the other bowl, the one with the second yolk. Beat this one like the first one until it looks a bit sticky. Now add the egg-oil mixture from the first bowl to this, one spoonful at a time, making sure to beat each spoonful in. Here you see the eggdrop oil mix going into the new emulsion:

It's quite safe to add that partially emulsified but separating mixture in spoonfuls rather than drop-by-drop to the new egg yolk emulsion. Just be sure that each spoonful is incorporated. Keep adding until all the eggdrop oil is gone. At this point you can resume adding the rest of the oil in the squeeze bottle, in a thin stream - keep beating, and it will not separate.

When all the oil is added, add the lemon juice. Start with 1 tablespoonfull, beat in, then taste. Add more if you want it a bit more lemony. The lemon juice will lighten the color of the mayo. Adjust the salt too, if needed.

You will end up with approximately 2 cups of beautiful mayonnaise.

This is pure, preservative-free mayonnaise, so use it up within a couple of days. Store it well covered in the refrigerator.
Variations and uses

    * Add 1 to 2 crushed garlic cloves to turn mayonnaise into aioli.
    * To make saffron aioli like you are served with a bouillabase in Marseilles, soak a pinch of saffron threads in a tiny bit of warm water. Whisk this into the garlic aioli above.
    * For Japanese style mayonnaise a la Kewpie, use rice vinegar for the vinegar component, a neutral flavored oil such as canola or safflower oil, and add a little sugar (about 1/2 teaspoon) when you add the salt.
    * Add about 1/2 cup of finely chopped pickles to turn it into tartar sauce.
    * Add a bit more lemon to the mayo than you normally might, and use as a sauce for seafood like shrimp and other shellfish. (At a certain restaurant in Strasbourg, France, they serve a humongous assiette de fruits de mer (seafood platter with a variety of steamed and chilled shellfish) with home made mayonnaise that is almost green because of the use of extra virgin olive oil.)
    * To lighten up mayonnaise, mix with plain yogurt or totally emulsified (in the food processor) cottage cheese.
    * Add chopped hardboiled eggs, or even just the egg yolks, to make it very eggy. Incease the amount of egg to make it egg salad.
    * My stepfather loves to eat grilled himono (dried fish), especially dried octopus or squid, with mayonnaise sprinkled with a little red pepper powder.
    * Mayonnaise is used as a sauce for okonomiyaki - Japanese veggle pancake, and takoyaki octopus balls.

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #21 on: August 06, 2008, 12:38:30 am »
Hey Yuri, if you are still wondering about separating eggs, watch the video, which is linked on the first post of this thread, for my method.

Satya

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2008, 05:25:22 am »
The mayo in the demo was thin.  I was sweating bullets and gave up.  Today I made more, with 7 egg yolks and about 1.5 cups evoo.  The color of the yolks is great, isn't it? 


Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2008, 05:31:12 am »
I found another recipe for Japanese mayonnaise. I'm worried that it's the soya bean oil that gives it it's flavor but recently thought of trying a 50/50 mixture of olive/flax seed oil to substitute.

beat 3 egg yolks and 1/2 tsp lemon juice in a bowl, add 1 cup oil slowly drops at a time to emulsify. When oil is done being added stir in 1.5 oz white miso, salt to taste, sprinkle of white pepper and pinch of grated orange, lime or lemon peel.

I also found a couple of recipes for homemade Sriracha style hot sauce, which combined with Japanese style mayonnaise makes one of my favorite dressings of all time. I'm thinking of using it with a raw fish or raw + cooked fish salad as raw meat doesn't seem to me to go well with sauces because it's so chewy.

Offline RawZi

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Re: Traditional Mayonnaise
« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2010, 03:50:01 pm »
    

    Note the pink "P" emblazoned on each intact shell still in that dozen carton.  They are pasteurizing eggs now.  I've seen it, even four years ago.  I dared not try then.  I was just coming off of vegan diet, but going from there "without passing go" to fertile eggs.  Anyone who has tried the "P" eggs here, do they really seem raw?  If not, in what ways don't they?

I discovered how to make mayonnaise that is creamy, eggy, and smooth without fail.

So if you have had mayonnaise problems too, read on....

Technorati Tags: mayo, mayonnaise
The ingredients

You will need:

    * 2 large, fresh, organic or pasteurized eggs. The egg is not cooked so it must be certifiably fresh and/or pasteurized. I use date-stamped eggs, or the fresh ones I can buy from a local farm.
    * 1 to 1 1/2 cups of oil. The choice of oil varies based on what you intend the mayo to be used for. Normally I use a flavorless oil such as peanut or safflower, but for making a mayo for dipping vegetables in, or as a basis for aioli (garlic mayonnaise) I use either a mixture of safflower and extra virgin olive oil, or olive oil alone. If you use all olive oil, the predominant taste in your mayo will be olive oil. My usual preference is for the egg flavor to be more forthcoming.
    * 1-2 Tbs. lemon juice or white wine vinegar. Again, the amount of acidic liquid you add will influence the flavor of your mayo.
    * 1/2 to 1 tsp. salt, to taste.
    * Optional: 1/4 Tbs mustard powder, OR 1 Tbs. mustard. Again...the type of mustard and the amount will also change the flavor. I actually prefer no mustard at all, or just a smidgen of mustard powder.

The equipment

    * I prefer to make mayonnaise with an electric whisk. You can use a food processor or a stick blender, but I find that both of those methods make a mayo that is very stiff. Whisks seem to make a lighter mayo. A hand whisk would work too, but electric is easier. The hand-cranked type of beater will not work because it requires two hands. One hand for your beater of choice, one hand for the squeeze bottle, is what you will need.
    * 2 small to medium sized bowls.
    * A moistened kitchen towel, to place under the bowls to keep them from moving about. This is critical since you will be using both hands as mentioned above.
    * A plastic squeeze bottle with a small nozzle. Mine is a $1 'dressing bottle' that I bought at the almost-everything-for-$1 store in Japantown in San Francisco.


    * Optional equipment: an iPod. You'll be standing around drizzling oil s-l-o-w-l-y for some time so the iPod will keep away the boredom. (You may choose to substitute another MP3 player.) For maximum effect use noise-cancelling headphones to shut out most of the egg beater racket.

The procedure

Put your chosen oil into the plastic squeeze bottle. My pink capped bottle just happens to hold exactly 1.5 cups.

Separate the egg yolks from the whites; discard the whites or keep them for something else. Put the two egg yolks in the two bowls - one yolk per bowl. Why? You will see.

Add about 1/2 tsp of salt and the optional mustard to one of the bowls.

Start beating at low speed. In short order the egg yolk will look rather sticky. Add the oil, drop by drop, to the egg yolk mixture. And I do mean drop by drop. This is really critical to creating the emulsion that is the basis of mayonnaise.

Keep adding the oil, drop by drop.

After a while you'll get tired and bored and start thinking, it's safe to add the oil faster now, and you'll squeeze that bottle a bit harder. It's human nature to do so, and besides, the books tell you that you can add the oil faster once the emulsion has started. Now, if you are lucky your mayo will still be smooth and cohesive. But in my case this is rare. Usually it separates into that icky eggdrop oil:

This is where the second yolk comes in. Transfer your whisk or beater to the other bowl, the one with the second yolk. Beat this one like the first one until it looks a bit sticky. Now add the egg-oil mixture from the first bowl to this, one spoonful at a time, making sure to beat each spoonful in. Here you see the eggdrop oil mix going into the new emulsion:

It's quite safe to add that partially emulsified but separating mixture in spoonfuls rather than drop-by-drop to the new egg yolk emulsion. Just be sure that each spoonful is incorporated. Keep adding until all the eggdrop oil is gone. At this point you can resume adding the rest of the oil in the squeeze bottle, in a thin stream - keep beating, and it will not separate.

When all the oil is added, add the lemon juice. Start with 1 tablespoonfull, beat in, then taste. Add more if you want it a bit more lemony. The lemon juice will lighten the color of the mayo. Adjust the salt too, if needed.

You will end up with approximately 2 cups of beautiful mayonnaise.

This is pure, preservative-free mayonnaise, so use it up within a couple of days. Store it well covered in the refrigerator.
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