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are you going bare?

Vibrams
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Mocs
2 (15.4%)
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Author Topic: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??  (Read 48787 times)

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Offline Ioanna

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #25 on: September 27, 2010, 01:43:27 am »
the play i was just in was outdoors, so for three months of rehearsals before the stage was set up we were just outside in an open field.  while waiting for one of my scenes i'd be running around barefoot in the grass, usually playing with someone's dog.  i know i didn't think about 'how' to run, i just ran around.. my heels never hit the ground until i stopped.  i felt like a kid, i could have run around forever it was so enjoyable!  i'm not sure how good i'd feel on the street though?.. haven't been brave enough to endure the public's opinion even if only revealed with a stare :(

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #26 on: September 27, 2010, 06:32:24 am »
Barefoot and forefoot walking/running has been a topic of interest to me for many years and there are several questions raised here, so I hope folks don't mind if I use this opportunity to discuss the topic in depth.

Been enjoying walking barefoot as much as possible for the last year. Not at work, but I don't work that much, (standby) so it's easy.
Concrete is not good and hot pavement is really not good
Yes, Raw-Al, I've noticed that concrete is one of the worst surfaces for walking and running on in bare feet or thin-soled shoes for more than short distances that I've encountered. I seem to have mildly injured my right forefoot walking in thin-soled shoes on concrete sidewalks, so I have temporarily added some more insole padding and I try to walk as much as possible on any grass adjacent to sidewalks until my foot recovers. Interestingly, barefoot walking on concrete does not seem quite as harsh as thin-soled shoe walking. I think it's because the bare foot is more flexible and can walk more gently. I think increased cushioning in shoes may have developed in part in response to concrete sidewalks.

Blacktop, when not hot, is much less of a problem for me. It feels much softer than concrete. My father explained that blacktop is less dense, with more air pockets.

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I noticed a couple of young girls (18 or so) in the neighbourhood walking/running BF.
Coincidentally, I was walking on my way to work when I saw for the first time a barefoot (and shirtless) guy jogging on the sidewalk of the main street in my neighborhood. I had only run barefoot in the woods up to that point. After seeing that I did some barefoot walking on the same main street when my right foot was really hurting me, which got some brief stares. It's amazing how rapidly the barefoot craze is taking off after an initial harsh reaction from the "experts" and the public.

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PP,
The moccasins that the Indians wore must have been nice. Do you know anything about them? Did they put the fur on the inside or outside?
Depending on the location, moccasins were reportedly usually made of furless hides:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Beadedmoccasins.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Soft_moccasin.jpg

When fur was used, my understanding is that fur could be on either the inside or the outside, but I'm no expert on moccasins.


I dunno wtf midfoot is, sounds like bs, although I've heard lots of people say it. I don't see how you can walk midfoot, unless your foot is shaped like the shoe in the attached image..
I wrote "heel-and-midfoot-first", not "midfoot walk", so I'm not sure why you cut out the mention of the heel, unless you were just reminded by mention of the word midfoot that "midfoot strike" is a commonly used imperfect term, such as by Danny Dreyer, founder of ChiRunning and ChiWalking, here:

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"The midfoot strike is characterized as having your heel and the ball of your foot touching the ground simultaneously with each foot strike." ("Midfoot strike, Forefoot strike or Heel strike…which one is best?" http://www.chirunning.com/blog/2008/07/25/midfoot-strike-forefoot-strike-or-heel-strike%E2%80%A6which-one-is-best)
As you can see by Danny's description, the midfoot strike is really more of a flatfoot strike centered over the midfoot. Clarity is good, but because it's both a new field of inquiry and a new lifestyle movement that involves people of diverse backgrounds, I think it's crucial to not get too hung up on the literal meanings of terminology and focus instead on what people actually mean as they try to come up with words to describe what they're talking about.  

I've seen those ridiculous curved-sole shoes before and I've always considered them a bizarre abomination. The part of the midfoot that naturally contacts the ground is not the middle of the foot's arch, it's the side of the foot, as showed by this footprint image , and it's not curved out like those shoes, nor is there any need for it to curve out in order to contact the ground. The developers of the shoe claim it creates the proper walking motion, but it makes no sense to me to create an artificial sole surface in order to promote natural walking. The bare sole of the foot is the best surface to promote that.

In my case "heel-and-midfoot-first" walking or near-flat-foot-walking, if you prefer, is not BS, it's just what I naturally do at the current time. I don't have a video camera to show it to you, unfortunately, but this is a pretty good approximation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZk4qoTVdnQ. It's a nearly flat-footed landing with the heel lightly contacting the ground first, instead of landing on the balls of the feet or pounding on the heel like this: . Sometimes I'll walk with less heel and more of a flat-foot strike if I'm consciously thinking about it, as in this example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfnAP1m6lNM&NR=1, but at this time I tend to naturally revert more toward the first example. The differences are subtle, but I find that putting more emphasis on the front of the foot still causes me more soreness after more than a year of barefoot and barefoot-style-shoe walking and running. It could be a transition stage (which I initially speculated months ago) or a result of weak connective tissues, like I wrote above, and weak foot muscles. I think because I'm still a little flat footed and have weak connective tissues, it may take longer for me to adjust to forefoot walking and perhaps I may never fully adjust.

I hypothesized in this forum months ago that forefoot-first walking is the natural method (see http://www.rawpaleoforum.com/exercisebodybuilding/born-to-run-tarahumara-barefoot-running-pose-method-chi-running-egoscue/msg20382/#msg20382, Nov 2009) and as early as January of 2007 in the PaleoFood forum (http://listserv.icors.org/SCRIPTS/WA-ICORS.EXE?A0=PALEOFOOD), and it first occurred to me many years before that, but, when I tried to force myself to gradually shift to forefoot-first walk I ended up with sore forefeet and couldn't continue with it.

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I suppose I might be able to film my walking/running barefoot somehow to show you, if I can find a camera >.>
I didn't doubt that you do it, Miles, but the more data the merrier, if you want to film it, as I am looking for more evidence to support my hypothesis of forefoot walking being the optimal natural method. However, I'm particularly interested in images or written reports of significant numbers of lifelong barefooters walking forefoot-first and thinking nothing of it, the way there is of traditional people commonly squat-sitting, "stack-sitting" and "tallstanding", rather than moderners consciously converting to it as you apparently did and like I tried to do.

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When I say forefoot I don't mean staying on my tip-toes...
Of course; I can't imagine anyone walking on their tip toes for very far and I've never seen anyone make that claim, so I don't know why you're mentioning that. Are you extrapolating "tip-toes" from the TV character comment about "toes-first" walking? I think it's more likely that the scriptwriter meant forefoot-first walking, rather than someone walking on their tip-toes. When I first heard the "toes-first" comment I thought the character meant that the toes contact the ground first in forefoot walking (though I didn't think he meant tiptoes, which would be a rather funny walking style for a killer in a remote desert :D ), but I later discovered through self-experimentation that the ball of the foot does, rather than the toes.

One article did refer to fox-walking as being like "tiptoeing" and also used the midfoot-strike terminology that you understandably take issue with. Despite advocating barefoot walking, the author took a harsh stand against forefoot walking being the natural method of walking (emphases mine):

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Barefoot walking is, in its mechanics, very similar to barefoot running. The idea is to eliminate the hard-heel strike and employ something closer to a mid-strike: landing softly on the heel but rolling immediately through the outside of your foot, then across the ball and pushing off with the toes, with a kind of figure-eight movement though the foot. There's a more exaggerated version of this style of walking known as "fox-walking," which is closer to tiptoeing and which has caught on with a small group of naturalists and barefoot hikers. Fox-walking involves landing on the outside of the ball of your foot, then slowly lowering the foot pad to feel for obstructions, then rolling through your toes and moving on. All of which is great, if you're stalking prey with a handmade crossbow, or you're an insane millionaire hunting humans as part of the Most Dangerous Game. As for walking in the city, fox-walking has no real practical application, in part because it's incredibly frustrating to master and in part because you look like a lunatic.  ("You Walk Wrong," http://nymag.com/health/features/46213)

Not trying to justify it, but maybe one reason that imprecise terms like mid-foot strike and tiptoeing are sometimes used is that flat-foot strike sounds too much like "flat feet," which is a bad thing, and people are more familiar with tiptoeing than forefoot walking. When I talk about forefoot-first walking I mean like the infants in these videos I found with a little searching some time ago:

Collin's First steps
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uU72k0daevU&feature=related

Baby Em's first steps
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWVM-m9veLo&feature=related

Interestingly, notice that those infants do a semi-shuffle-step that resembles some of the traditional dance steps of Zhu/wasi Bushmen:

Bushmen dance at SanDüne
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4p2QBHCdjT8

Maybe they mean the very back of the ball of the foot? Or more of a flat strike where the ball hits a moment before, or at the same time, as the heel?
The answer appears to be the latter, and below is another example of this that I recently came across. Here too, they use "mid-foot strike" as a synonym for "flat-foot strike." Again, I'm not defending it, but just explaining that it appears to be an imperfect way of briefly describing a foot strike in which the heel is not pounded hard like is typical with a big-heeled shoe and neither is the strike solely on the ball of the foot.

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"Here we show that habitually barefoot endurance runners often land on the fore-foot (fore-foot strike) before bringing down the heel, but they sometimes land with a flat foot (mid-foot strike) or, less often, on the heel (rear-foot strike). In contrast, habitually shod runners mostly rear-foot strike, facilitated by the elevated and cushioned heel of the modern running shoe." (Foot strike patterns and collision forces in habitually barefoot versus shod runners, http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v463/n7280/full/nature08723.html)
By quoting that excerpt I'm not trying to imply that "mid-foot strike" is a good description. I think flat-foot strike is more apt.

I've been keeping my eyes out for more evidence of forefoot-first walking among adults. I've been puzzled by the fact that I haven't found much of it yet other than a few anecdotal reports and some opinion-based pieces at barefoot-promoting websites. I've even found reports from longtime forefoot-first runners that they still have some heel strike in their walk. I thought Esther Gokhale's book, 8 Steps to a Pain-Free Back, might contain some evidence, since she studied some relatively traditional people of Burkina Faso, including some barefooters, but I was suprised to find her advocating heel-strike-walking (though she did at least advocate a light heel strike) and images that show heel-striking. She even instructs to "press" the heel towards the floor/ground. She further states that a common mistake is "not leaving the heel on the ground long enough." That was the biggest surprise of all for me.

Don't worry, I haven't abandoned my original tentative hypothesis of many years ago, which is that forefoot-first barefoot walking is the most natural style, since that's how all infants apparently start out walking, but I've been puzzled by my difficulty in finding photographic or textual evidence of this from first-hand observations of adults in longtime barefoot-walking populations. Anything people might have along those lines that they could share would be much appreciated. The first time I researched this on the Internet I don't recall finding any references to it, then eventually one or two, but with the recent barefoot craze there has been a growing amount of information that touches on it, so I'm confident that the evidence one way or the other will become clear in the near future.

On the other hand, I was little surprised to discover a video that shows a chimp walking heel-first:

Then again, humans aren't chimps.

I have walked on my forefoot first since I saw some Martial arts movie, maybe Karate Kid. Grasshopper not want rip rice paper.
Thanks for sharing that, raw-al. That encourages me some more to think that my hypothesis may be on target. I saw the original Karate Kid and don't remember that, despite my curiosity about the topic before I saw it. If anyone knows whether it was in that movie or another, I'd be interested to know which one.

If the entire Japanese people recently walked forefoot-first, that would be huge evidence and it would lead me to expect that the Chinese did also, which would of course be massive evidence and the only potential remaining argument at that point for heel-strike walking would be biological differences between groups requiring some people of some backgrounds to heel-strike, which would be a weak argument.

It's pretty neat to find other people in Western culture who share my interest in barefoot- and forefoot-first walking and running. Years ago I used to wonder if I was one of only a few modern people who were interested. People used to act like I was nuts if I dared to talk about it, :) but the growing number of news stories on it has gotten a few to start to take me seriously about it--though no one has converted to barefooting or barefoot-style shoes (my father considered the latter, but the prices turned him off). So thanks much for the inputs here!


@Lex: Thanks for the fascinating reports. I too have noticed that I handle both hotter and colder water and weather than other slim people now. In the past even warm water felt hot and stingy to my feet at times, and I told my physician of the time about it and he thought I was nuts, of course. Now I can put my feet or hands in water that other slim people tell me is way too hot or cold and it feels good to me instead of painful. I too think that my circulation has improved, though I still can't stay in cold water as long as my relatives that have much more body fat. I think this may be because the cold water has more direct access to my bones and its the bones that chill us most.

Running into broken glass nearly everywhere is one of the annoyances of barefooting. It has brought to my attention the vast amount of broken glass that can be found, even deep in the woods and even now with recycling. It seems to have increased in recent years, which I think may be due to the fact that inflation has made the nickel deposit worth much less than what it was when the law went into effect in the 1970s.

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I read that a forefoot strike was the natural way to walk barefoot so tried to force myself to walk that way.
Where did you read that?

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Over time I gave up the quest as my body just didn’t want to do it on normal surfaces.  It naturally seemed to want a light heal strike then a roll onto the ball of the foot with the toes spread followed by a push-off from the forefoot and toes. .... My gait will also change to forefoot strike first when walking on crushed gravel or other very uneven surfaces, but on solid surfaces like dirt, grass, asphalt, and concrete my normal gait is a light heal strike first.
Same here. I gave up for the time being on everyday forefoot walking, but I've always used a forefoot strike when walking barefoot on sharp gravel, even when I wore big-heeled shoes.
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Offline raw

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2010, 10:23:43 am »
hi parker, my toddler always walks on the grass barefooted. i also prefer to walk on wild grass. not those city grown grass. but this event sounds very exiting. me and my family may be can come.
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Offline miles

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2010, 02:43:59 am »
It is not the ball of my foot which touches first, but near the outside corner. When you say I consciously changed... Yes I was conscious of the change but I in no way forced myself to do it, any more than a toddler or a caveman would. I just naturally adapted my movement based on feedback and this is what I've got...
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Offline Michael

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2010, 02:47:11 am »
Blimey PaleoPhil!  You weren't kidding when you mentioned taking the opportunity to discuss the topic in depth!!!  :)  When I find a couple of spare days I hope to work my way through that last post!  ;)  As you know, this is also a subject I'm very interested in so I hope I find those spare days soon.  I did watch the videos but need to watch them again as I wasn't monitoring her feet sufficiently!  ;)

Lex, you're an inspiration!  It's really encouraging to read of your progress with your barefoot lifestyle.  Like raw-al, as a fellow woodworker, I'm very impressed that you're able to do this barefoot and would love to be able to achieve such a level of hardness/durability on my feet.  It does make me think that this whole 'minimalist' footwear thing should only be used as a brief stepping stone to achieving a true barefoot lifestyle.


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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #30 on: September 28, 2010, 05:50:37 am »
It is not the ball of my foot which touches first, but near the outside corner. When you say I consciously changed... Yes I was conscious of the change but I in no way forced myself to do it, any more than a toddler or a caveman would. I just naturally adapted my movement based on feedback and this is what I've got...
Fascinating. I envy you. ;D So you had no idea that the ball of the foot was the optimal strike point and the change just occurred naturally and unconsciously? How long did this take? Do you have strong muscles and connective tissues in the feet, ankles, lower legs, and knees and good posture?
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
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>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
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Offline Parker Reid

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2010, 07:31:18 am »
"hi parker, my toddler always walks on the grass barefooted. i also prefer to walk on wild grass. not those city grown grass. but this event sounds very exiting. me and my family may be can come."

- Yah I've always wondered about natural surfaces. When it comes down to long distance running I'm curious to what surfaces are the best.

-if anyone knows.... let me know.

Offline miles

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2010, 09:57:05 pm »
Fascinating. I envy you. ;D So you had no idea that the ball of the foot was the optimal strike point and the change just occurred naturally and unconsciously? How long did this take? Do you have strong muscles and connective tissues in the feet, ankles, lower legs, and knees and good posture?

When I started running barefoot, I was considered to have big muscles by people I knew, and I was strong in doing ~10rep max range of controlled movements, but my muscles and joints would easily become inflamed from any impact or sudden stuff. I got pain in my knees from running on hard surfaces in shoes unless I'd already been running for hrs on soft surfaces. This is why I started running barefoot, and it worked. Because of this stuff, I guess I may've been more sensitive to problems in technique than someone else.

When I started running barefooted it was before I knew about Paleodiet never mind RPD, it was sort of a gateway as I was in the right frame of mind, and I started eating Paleo a few months later.

The thought was that it's natural to run barefoot, so I shouldn't need to think about it, and I'll just react to the feedback from my body, not think about how I should be running, and just let myself adapt. On the heel just didn't work so initially I was running on my forefoot and without putting my heel down. I was doing short-ish, fast-ish runs at this point. Then one day I did my longest run, and my calves got tired so I started putting my heels down after the forefoot to rest my calves.

When walking, heel-first was awkward and I had to try not to put my heel down hard because it was uncomfortable, and this was limiting, and putting my forefoot down first wasn't comfortable either. I just ran everywhere as my walking ability was worse than with shoes whilst my running was better than before, and certainly anyone I knew. Then after a change of location, I found myself a few miles from my food-source, and at the time I would get my food I considered rest-time, so I didn't fancy running. This meant I was 'forced' to walk several miles every day. At some point not long in to this I found it was more comfortable putting the outside corners of my feet down first, rather than the ball, because the ball part was suffering impacts from the ground and this altered way was absorbing the shock better. Then I found myself naturally adopting this same movement in running. It actually allowed me to run with my knees less bent I think too, as I had more effective flexion this way.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2010, 10:08:55 pm by miles »
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Offline Josh

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2010, 10:50:01 pm »
I have to say I haven't put much thought into barefoot running and it clicked ok for me. I just got some vivo boots and started wearing them all the time, then went abroad and ran in them as well.

I didn't build it up slowly, but I'm lucky that I know how to take care of problems that muscles have, so cautious is probably the best approach. It did put a strain on my rectus femoris and other quads at first, and I had to treat the knots.

Offline raw-al

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #34 on: September 28, 2010, 11:20:14 pm »
I have found that if I feel any discomfort on the sole it is because of a splinter which could be anything from a  a thorn to metal or whatever. Even if not visible, it is a foreign intruder. I can get it out now or like Lex says when it starts to infect.

However my soles get tougher each day, as I am pretty much always barefoot inside and out. Winter will be a challenge though. My friend grew up on a farm in Saskatchewan Canada and he says that barefoot was the norm from March to October / November. He has some Indian (aboriginal) blood.
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #35 on: September 29, 2010, 08:28:31 am »
... I guess I may've been more sensitive to problems in technique than someone else.
My problems occur when I use supposedly proper technique. I didn't develop any calf problems, just forefoot and ankle problems. Like Lex, I do better at this time when I walk with a light heel strike or flatfoot strike than when I forefoot-walk.

It sounds like some of you live in rural areas with moderately soft ground. There are woods near me, but even they have a much-traveled mostly very hard-packed trail and I live downtown and walk to work in a city, so much of my walking is on concrete sidewalks, hard ground and very hard floors, and I think that may account for some of the difference.

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The thought was that it's natural to run barefoot, so I shouldn't need to think about it, and I'll just react to the feedback from my body, not think about how I should be running, and just let myself adapt.
Yes, that's exactly what I'm doing and I find my body naturally gravitates to somewhere between a light heel strike and a flatfoot strike when walking; jogging is a flatfoot strike and sprinting is a forefoot strike for me. It has been nearly two years since I switched to wearing only barefoot-style shoes and doing as much barefoot walking as I can. I had expected that I would develop a forefoot-walk by now, but it hasn't happened yet. About how long did it take for your body to develop a natural forefoot-walk?
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #36 on: September 29, 2010, 11:42:47 am »
Like Miles, when running, the outside of my forefoot strikes first, toes spread as I roll to the ball of the foot followed by the toes hitting and finally the heal drops to absorb shock and prepare for then next push off.  This change was automatic and noticable but just as miles said, not forced.

Overall, footstrike constantly adjusts depending on gait, surface type, and terrain.  My body just seems to know what to do depending on these factors but it did take a good bit of time for this to happen.

Lex

Offline miles

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #37 on: September 29, 2010, 06:04:03 pm »
Well I developed a forefoot walk probably in about a week of walking a few miles a day. However by that time I'd been travelling barefoot for ~2 years, 1000s of miles. It's just that I'd never walked barefoot with purpose up until that point. If I was barefoot and had purpose to get somewhere I'd always run. If I was walking and felt I wanted to go faster I'd switch to running(forefoot), and this was most of the time as I couldn't walk very fast at all barefoot, especially on hard surfaces. Heel-first very much limits the speed you can go at without shocking the bone. I would've switched to walking forefoot sooner if I'd had a reason to stay walking and not run earlier on. I would naturally try to walk forefoot early on, to absorb shock and allow me to move faster, but found it tiring around my achilles, as it's a different movement to running, and I was already used to that so I would just switch. Also the forefoot can touch much earlier on the outside of the foot than the ball, and in the beginning I used to put my forefoot down flat, as the skin outside of my foot wore out very quickly when it was my first point of contact with the ground. In this later time the skin on theoutside of my forefoot was now strong, and I only just remembered writing this that this is why I previously ran/tried to walk flat-forefooted(forefoot north-south but flat east-west).
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #38 on: September 29, 2010, 07:29:39 pm »
Like Miles, when running, the outside of my forefoot strikes first, toes spread as I roll to the ball of the foot followed by the toes hitting and finally the heal drops to absorb shock and prepare for then next push off.  This change was automatic and noticable but just as miles said, not forced.
Same here. Where I think you and I find we do things differently from Miles, if I understand correctly, is that we don't forefoot-walk, despite having tried it, yes? Perhaps it will just take more time to adapt further, I don't know.

I don't shock my feet when barefoot walking, because I find myself naturally using either a light heel strike, or a flatfoot-strike. So I neither do a hard heel strike nor a forefoot strike when walking. The faster I move, the more my feet naturally transition forward to a forefoot strike. Like you two, when I walk I naturally connect first on the outside of my foot too before the ball, I just don't find myself naturally landing on the fore part of the foot first, even though I thought I would. When I do try that I get soreness in my forefoot.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2010, 08:10:29 pm by PaleoPhil »
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>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
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Offline Marissa

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #39 on: September 30, 2010, 01:21:54 am »
I'm really new to this forum, but I was wondering, what is the point of barefoot running?  It seems like it would hurt your skin and bruise your feet more.  I'm a new mother and I can't even imagine trying this right now.
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Offline raw

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #40 on: September 30, 2010, 03:54:35 am »
we are civilized people, and put ourselves wearing shoes all day long which  is more abnormal than anything else!! ;)
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Offline miles

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #41 on: September 30, 2010, 04:09:50 am »
I'm really new to this forum, but I was wondering, what is the point of barefoot running?  It seems like it would hurt your skin and bruise your feet more.  I'm a new mother and I can't even imagine trying this right now.

The point of barefoot running is that it's>all.
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Offline lex_rooker

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #42 on: September 30, 2010, 09:03:31 am »
Phil,
I agree that Miles walks forefoot first and we don’t.  I suppose that I could force myself to do this and then when I mastered it I could call it “normal”.  I decided not to do this.  I just let my body decide how my foot should strike depending on the conditions at the time.

Marissa,
It takes some time to get over the conditioning of wearing shoes all our lives, however, for me it has been of great benefit.  Posture has improved and many aches and pains (that shoe supports are supposed to solve) have gone away once I adapted to barefoot.  We aren’t born with shoes.  Why do we think that wearing them is important to our health?  Most on this forum have found that once we are weaned away from the societal norms our health and happiness significantly improve.

Lex

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #43 on: September 30, 2010, 10:01:25 am »
... I just let my body decide how my foot should strike depending on the conditions at the time. ...
Same here
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Sully

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #44 on: October 06, 2010, 10:01:49 am »
The harder the surface is your walking on, the lighter your heel will strike the ground to prevent injury. Your body does it naturally.

Walking/running on cement is bad barefooted, very bad. Dirt is no where near cement in hardness. You can hammer a nail through dirt but not cement.

Most of walking/running our ancestors did was done on softer surface than cement.

Conditioning the foot, and walking on cement are 2 different things. Walking on cement conditions your foot but can cause knee injuries.
 
Oh, on animal skins people used for winter times, they fit the shape of the foot. When you walk the animal hide would just press against you skin, fitting the form.

If anyone chooses to go bare, do so on natural surfaces like dirt or grass etc.

I have done barefoot, and sandals on cement both suck and cause injuries when on man made cement. I walk for miles and miles in a given day. THE BEST SHOES FOR THE URBAN JUNGLE I HAD ARE THESE BAD BOYS, THESE FEEL THE BEST FOR ME WHEN I WALK SEVERAL MILES A DAY ON MAN MADE HARD SURFACES



Only if there were still dirt roads....

Offline Sully

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #45 on: October 06, 2010, 10:06:55 am »
Even though the shoes here I wear protect me when walking on cement, I still can get knee injuries If I run long distance on cement even with shoes.

I always do my long distance running on grass.

Offline raw

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #46 on: October 06, 2010, 10:49:52 am »
sully, i never think about that to tear up nice pair of running shoes like that, so air can get through this. great idea!!! :D so we don't need to wear socks i guess!!
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Offline Sully

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #47 on: October 06, 2010, 11:48:57 am »
sully, i never think about that to tear up nice pair of running shoes like that, so air can get through this. great idea!!! :D so we don't need to wear socks i guess!!
yes raw, when I wear these my feet don't stink. But if I wear shoes with no holes, my feet stink, which is why people wear socks to absorb sweat in shoes with no holes that have little air flow. these shoes are a mircale. I don't care if people stare at them. they are pure genius.

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #48 on: October 06, 2010, 11:50:32 am »
I've found that once my feet toughened up, cement and asphalt have been no problem at all.  I can easily walk many miles on these surfaces with no problem.  I can also walk on crushed gravel without a problem.  Shoes, on the other hand, tend to force my feet and ankles into unnatural positions.  I discovered this in the 1970's when Niki came out with their Waffle Trainers.  These were hailed as the holy grail of foot wear for runners to avoid ankle and knee injury.  I found just the opposite. The wide flat soles and all the padding restricted the natural rolling motion of my foot when running and actually caused more stress on my knees and ankles.  I just couldn't wear them without risking ankle and knee injury.  However, I did find that wearing racing flats that had a very thin sole and no padding at all didn't cause me any problems. Just my experinece,

Lex
« Last Edit: October 06, 2010, 12:03:01 pm by lex_rooker »

Offline miles

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Re: OH YEAH! barefoot run!!! whos going??
« Reply #49 on: October 06, 2010, 10:40:31 pm »
Walking many miles every day, barefoot, on hard man-made surfaces is not a problem.
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