Author Topic: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in  (Read 7565 times)

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Offline Iguana

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Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« on: November 12, 2011, 04:15:08 am »
I’ve been asked the following by PM, but as those questions are of general interest, I answer here.

Quote
I personally dont know if wild animals eat according intincto but reading the book wild health by cindy engel may be informative. Iv read several pages and the author says that wild mice nibble a certain plant first then come back to the food if it hasnt become sick/ poisoned. Also wild animas look at other animals to see which plant is toxic and which plant is not. Is this in conflict with the instincto theory? I personally dont like the taste of certain foods but eat them anyway because they provide good nutrition and i feel well from it.
I don’t think this is in conflict with the instincto theory. It seems the body sometimes has to get use to unusual foods, perhaps because a certain foodstuff needs specific enzymes to be digested and metabolized. Thus, if the body doesn’t have a sufficient provision of such enzymes, it’s unable to digest a significant amount of the stuff at first.

That’s a theory and I don’t know whether it’s right or wrong, but I’ve experienced such a phenomenon, for example with liver, shellfish and safus (safu is an African non-sweet fruit very rich in fat and protein)

Unripe safus


Ripe safus

The first time I ate those foods, it was in very small amounts, I just couldn’t eat more. For example, half of a safu and latter a full one once in a way. Then I didn’t have the opportunity to find safus for about 3 years till I received a full box of it. I got them ripe and dried them before I put them in a closed jar to perhaps give them to whoever likes them. But at my surprise, I happen now to like safus so much that tonight I ate not less than 13!

About the second point, sure, we can learn from each other which stuffs are edible, it’s easier and faster than proceeding by lengthy trial and errors.

For your third point, how do you know that those certain foods you don’t like the taste provide good nutrition for you? The fact that you feel well just afterwards doesn’t necessarily means it’s good for you in the long term. Coffee, alcohols, cassava, wheat, dairy and such make you feel good on the moment, but they are just some kinds of drugs.

Cheers
François
« Last Edit: November 12, 2011, 05:05:45 am by Iguana »
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline Iguana

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2011, 03:10:02 am »
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Thanks for responding, but i am still unsure if all wild animals eat instincto.

I like the taste of some sources of muscle beef but the organs i dont like. I eat the organs because i read their high in certain nutrients. Some say nature provides while others say that it doesnt and therefore one should do whatever one can including cooking, burning , and killing everything just to survive( which humans are currently doing). I am on the fence on this issue.

An animal would certainly never eat anything he doesn’t like because, unlike you, an animal can’t read that some stuffs are high in certain nutrients.

It’s probably essential to eat organs for “zero carbers” eating exclusively meat, but for someone who also eats various raw foods such as plants, nuts, fruits, eggs and shellfish, I think it’s not necessary to eat organs, even more so if these organs aren’t tasty.
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline Dorothy

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2011, 11:52:33 am »
I don't see at all why learning that a food is edible for others of your same species or from other species or first taking small bites would negate anything instincto. Those animals still are going to use their senses when it comes to whether or not to continue to eat it and how much.

Also, I thought Iguana about you eating just a little and then a lot later. It also just might have been that your body at the first trial did not need/want what was in that food, but might have very much needed it later. That's very instincto right?

Everyone that is smart eats only a little of a brand new food first. It's an incredibly natural and instinctual thing to do. It's like going into a new environment/situation slowly. It's pretty universal.

I love hearing about all your variety of fruits Iguana. Makes me want to travel the world over tasting them! That picture you posted made my mouth water. I bet I'd eat a baker's dozen of those too!

Offline billy4184

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2011, 08:02:10 pm »
First time I've heard of safus! What do they taste like?
Cheers
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Offline Inger

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2011, 12:35:01 am »
Safus taste.. niceee.. ;)
A little sour touch, depending on how ripe.. Some says they tastes like goat-cheese. Could be. Or potato. ;D
They are very rich in flavour but I would say quite mild though? Fatty.. yum.
There is not much flesh on them though.
I just got some today in the post, I have not have them for a long time. I like them. :)
Really ripe, they are the best. Doesn't matter if they are a little moldy. They have to ripen  in a humid and warm place.

Inger
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 01:29:23 am by TylerDurden »

Offline Inger

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2011, 12:41:18 am »
I ate lungs (Elk lungs) for the first time in my life today.
I cut small pieces and chewed a bit but it was kinda strange feeling so I just swallowed them whole. :o
Taste was very mild. Not bad at all.
I also tried Elk kidneys, I never liked kidneys but I tried anyway. I just cut up pieces and swallowed. A little strange taste though.
What are kidneys and lungs good for?
I tried Elkheart too. That I loved. I love any heart I think.  -X

I wonder when I get used to kidneys and lungs. I do not care though.. I just swallow. ;)
I know it must be great stuff. I just felt amazing today. :)

Inger

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2011, 02:50:40 am »
    I haven't found good lungs yet, but I heard they're good for lungs. Kidneys I find easiest very well thoroughly fermented.  I hear elk tastes very good.
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2011, 11:06:31 am »
This reminds me that some folks here said that Asian markets should have the exotic tropical fruits that people rave about here, like safus, durian, custard apple and so forth. I diligently checked out all the local Asian and health food markets, hunting down every one I could find, to the tiniest little Asian and Indian markets, and none of them had a single one of these fruits, so no luck here. Even coconuts are considered relatively exotic and sold in very small numbers in this area, LOL.

An even more stark contrast to the tropical-fruit rich areas was the rural inland Ireland of my grandparents' youth. They had never even seen an orange or banana or even an apple until they came to this country. Heck, tropical fruits were largely limited to the tropics until relatively recently, historically speaking, when the development of commercial shipping enabled them to spread to other markets, and the tropical fruit business reportedly didn't really get booming until railways, trucks and refrigeration made it much easier. I wonder if some folks forget just how much things have changed within the last couple centuries.

To satisfy my mad scientist nature, I was forced to order some durian via the Internet some time ago and durian is apparently one of the foods that can take time to adapt to (though it wasn't fresh, of course, so that's probably a factor too). It tasted like fermented onion to me, rather bland and mediocre. Somewhat disappointing, though I had heard some say that it tasted like fermented onion to them and I'm not a big fan of onions, so it wasn't a big shock. Some fans say the taste can be acquired, which I can believe, and that it eventually will taste like yummy ice cream if you keep eating it.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 11:13:35 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
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Offline goodsamaritan

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2011, 11:12:20 am »
IMHO re durian, I think liking it is GENETIC.

It's either you are born to absolutely love it... or you are born absolutely hating it.

First time I smelled and tasted durian I think I was 10 years old... and my love for the smell and taste of it has remained the same.  It is the very same thing with my 3 children.
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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2011, 11:14:31 am »
I guess I have a fluke gene ;) , because I neither hate it nor love it. It's just mediocre to me. I could eat it if it was the only thing handy, but otherwise I would skip it. It didn't smell bad to me like some people report, but maybe that's because I'm used to the smell of high meat and other fermented foods?

What does durian taste like to your taste buds, GS?
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline goodsamaritan

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2011, 11:30:17 am »
I guess I have a fluke gene ;) , because I neither hate it nor love it. It's just mediocre to me. I could eat it if it was the only thing handy, but otherwise I would skip it. It didn't smell bad to me like some people report, but maybe that's because I'm used to the smell of high meat and other fermented foods?

What does durian taste like to your taste buds, GS?

You probably bought MEDIOCRE durian.

There are several varieties of durian, all with different tastes. 

Ones I get here are called: TD4 (Thailand 4), Malaysian, Puyat and sometimes "Corn".

Durian is heavenly and filling.  I like best the TD4, Malaysian and Puyat varieties.

I've had mediocre durian too, those suck.  In the market I'd challenge the seller I'd return and exchange any mediocre durian they sell to me on the spot upon opening.  It's probably hard to do that when it is shipped by mail.

Mediocre durian is plenty.  All the mediocre durian are made into ice cream and durian candy.

Ha ha, you made me durian hungry I remembered I have some in the refrigerator.  So I'm eating some for you!  ;D
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2011, 11:39:34 am »
LOL, good for you! So which one is the best tasting durian of those three?
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline goodsamaritan

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2011, 11:41:55 am »
LOL, good for you! So which one is the best tasting durian of those three?

I like all 3 equally.  So I buy all 3.  If I just buy 1 variety I'd get sick of it after a week or two because of monotony.
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Offline djr_81

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2011, 05:57:39 am »
This reminds me that some folks here said that Asian markets should have the exotic tropical fruits that people rave about here, like safus, durian, custard apple and so forth. I diligently checked out all the local Asian and health food markets, hunting down every one I could find, to the tiniest little Asian and Indian markets, and none of them had a single one of these fruits, so no luck here. Even coconuts are considered relatively exotic and sold in very small numbers in this area, LOL.
That doesn't surprise me that much Phil. Maybe I'm misguided in my thinking but I would assume that where you are there isn't a large percentage of recent Asian immigrants. You stock the market for what the locals will buy.

For the record the Asian market I frequent is in Hartsdale, about 20-25 miles north of NYC, and is a supplier of many local Asian restaurants as we have a large population of first and second generation Asian immigrants in the area. I've only found frozen durian and jackfruit when I went but they've had tons of other fresh "exotic" fruits (persimmons, mountain apples, dragonfruit, many varieties of mangos & papayas, guavas, passion fruits, calamansi, kumquats, mangosteen, longan, rambutan, lychee, etc, etc.) and green coconuts.

The fruit I have difficulty sourcing when I want to indulge is Cherimoya. Everything is shipped from California or abroad and it's very perishable so is rarely available. I've actually had the best luck finding it in Hannaford's supermarkets.
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2011, 09:21:52 am »
That doesn't surprise me that much Phil. Maybe I'm misguided in my thinking but I would assume that where you are there isn't a large percentage of recent Asian immigrants. You stock the market for what the locals will buy.
Quite right, that's what I think too. I don't know anyone around here who's even heard of durian, much less eaten it. I even asked a Jamaican and she had never heard of it. I suspect that folks in Southeast Asia, California, NYC and other coastal urban areas, and parts of Europe where these exotic fruits are available may not realize how different it is in rural landlocked subArctic places like where I live. So when they say "just go to any Asian market" they may not realize that our Asian markets are not like theirs. Like I said, here coconuts are considered exotic. LOL One of the local markets that's labeled as "Asian" isn't even Asian in the sense that most people think of. It's Indian instead of East Asian. The only fresh fruits it had were oranges and grapefruits. LOL

Quote
I've only found frozen durian and jackfruit when I went but they've had tons of other fresh "exotic" fruits (persimmons, mountain apples, dragonfruit, many varieties of mangos & papayas, guavas, passion fruits, calamansi, kumquats, mangosteen, longan, rambutan, lychee, etc, etc.) and green coconuts.
Wow, that's amazing. I've never seen mountain apples, dragonfruit, calamansi, mangosteen (except for juice), longan, rambutan or lychee (except again for juice). I've noticed that a lot of the fruitarians and 811ers seem to live in California, NYC, Florida and other coastal areas or Southeast Asia.

Quote
The fruit I have difficulty sourcing when I want to indulge is Cherimoya. Everything is shipped from California or abroad and it's very perishable so is rarely available. I've actually had the best luck finding it in Hannaford's supermarkets.
We have Hannaford's here, but I don't recall seeing cherimoya in it. I'll keep my eye out for it, but like you said, they probably cater to what the locals are used to. It would get pretty boring pretty fast around here if I tried to eat a fruitarian diet.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Unusual foods sometimes require a period of breaking in
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2011, 11:59:47 pm »

The fruit...I want to indulge is Cherimoya.

Well, I AM pretty addictive.

 

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