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Offline Joy2012

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soaking pumpkin seeds question
« on: May 10, 2012, 03:34:38 pm »
When I soak pumpkin seeds, I have to remember to change soaking water in about 10 hours. If I forget and let the same pot of water soaking pumpkin seeds for a whole day, the water will have a kind of "fermentation" smell and so do the pumpkin seeds, especially as the weather gets warmer.  The "fermented" taste remains with pumpkin seeds even after they have been dehydrated.  I do not dislike the fermented taste.

My question is: Is this harmful to health?

Offline jessica

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2012, 08:08:01 pm »
ive had mine get kinda funky too, i would still toast them and eat them but eating them "fermented" always tastes too weird for me, actually i would always toast or atleast dehydrate after seeds have been soaked, but that is what digests best for me:)

http://www.sproutpeople.com/seed/print/pumpkin.html

Offline raw-al

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2012, 08:13:13 pm »
My first thought is that I would not be concerned. I have blueberries and raspberries that are from last fall. I eat a bit now and then.

However, I know that LSD comes from a mould that grows on wheat.

Why do you soak them?
If it is to sprout them, I would just use a small bit of water and put them in a jar with a porous natural cloth over the top instead of a lid. Just rinse them and then pour off most of the water.

We used to sprout a large number of things without fermentation.

Are you certain they are not heated?
Cheers
Al

Offline raw-al

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2012, 08:15:45 pm »
Actually on reading Jessica's link it says to sprout them only for an hour.

BTW we used to sprout the various varieties of chick peas.
Cheers
Al

Offline Joy2012

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2012, 08:49:28 pm »
Thanks for responses.

I was just wondering if "fermentation" acutally makes pumpkin seeds more nutritious. But if molds are involved...that is another matter... On the other hand, I doubt molds will grow within one day on pumpkin seeds though.

Offline Dorothy

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2012, 03:41:39 am »
About 3 hours seems to work nicely for me.... but even if I forget about them I don't worry about the fermentation. I work hard to ferment so many things! Some people soak wheatberries way past what's necessary and try to ferment the water and then drink it - it's called rejuvelac.

I've never felt even a little bad from soaking pumpkin seeds overnight, rinsing them in the morning and dehydrating them and I've done that more times than I could ever count. There are lots of things that don't sit well with me - so it's not like I have an iron stomach either.

I tend to soak most of my seeds way past the time that is said is necessary because it's so much easier just to leave them all overnight and deal with them all in the morning. It works out fine for me for every different kind of nut and seed that I've tried - which I think might be everyone in creation.  ;)


Offline van

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2012, 03:50:07 am »
99.9 percent of all organic pumpkin seeds are now from China, and won't sprout.  At least here in Ca.  I did get some from Sunfood that are grown in Europe.  I have been using these for years.  A totally different seed, one that grows hulless, that is used throughout Europe for Prostrate health etc.  They definitely sprout, and I soak those for about eight hours, trying to rinse and resoak at four hours.  I think the anti-nutrients, some come off with soaking, some are transformed or broken down with sprouting, can get reabsorbed with the soak water....   Chinese seeds probably are dead due to using heat to aid in getting off the hull.  I think they are nasty tasting, unless one masks their flavor with herbs and salt etc...

Offline Dorothy

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2012, 04:26:17 am »
Oh - I must be lucky! My pumpkin seeds sprout. I always test my seeds to see if they start to grow. Some nuts you just can't do that with like walnuts since they are broken - a seed cut in half can't sprout.

Why on earth would we import pumpkin seeds from China when they are so very easy to grow here?!  :o l) :P ??? >:

Offline Joy2012

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2012, 04:41:45 am »
About 3 hours seems to work nicely for me.... but even if I forget about them I don't worry about the fermentation. I work hard to ferment so many things! Some people soak wheatberries way past what's necessary and try to ferment the water and then drink it - it's called rejuvelac.

I've never felt even a little bad from soaking pumpkin seeds overnight, rinsing them in the morning and dehydrating them and I've done that more times than I could ever count. There are lots of things that don't sit well with me - so it's not like I have an iron stomach either.

I tend to soak most of my seeds way past the time that is said is necessary because it's so much easier just to leave them all overnight and deal with them all in the morning. It works out fine for me for every different kind of nut and seed that I've tried - which I think might be everyone in creation.  ;)

Thanks.  The example of wheatberries make sense. I will conclude that "fermented" pumpkin seeds are good then.

Offline Joy2012

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2012, 04:43:40 am »
99.9 percent of all organic pumpkin seeds are now from China, and won't sprout.  At least here in Ca.  I did get some from Sunfood that are grown in Europe.  I have been using these for years.  A totally different seed, one that grows hulless, that is used throughout Europe for Prostrate health etc.  They definitely sprout, and I soak those for about eight hours, trying to rinse and resoak at four hours.  I think the anti-nutrients, some come off with soaking, some are transformed or broken down with sprouting, can get reabsorbed with the soak water....   Chinese seeds probably are dead due to using heat to aid in getting off the hull.  I think they are nasty tasting, unless one masks their flavor with herbs and salt etc...
If seeds from China are dead, then I suppose they cannot claim the seeds are "raw" on the package.

Offline Dorothy

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2012, 04:49:43 am »
They can claim anything they want Joy since there is are no laws regarding labeling something raw. The best way to find out for sure if a seed is really raw is to try to sprout it. Most seed even with just soaking start to grow some - including pumpkin seeds, but you can take your soaked pumpkin seeds and put them in a colander or stainer and rinse them 3 or 4 times a day. They should start to grow to the point where you have no doubts. Some bigger nuts take longer but pumpkin seeds you should get sprouts pretty fast.

Offline Alina

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2016, 11:32:53 pm »
Hi Dorothy,
I have always thought that if there is a tiny thing sticking out from my soaked seeds and nuts then it means that they are raw. But you are saying that even dead seed can have this tiny sprout?
Thank you.


Offline eveheart

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2016, 02:31:50 am »
I have always thought that if there is a tiny thing sticking out from my soaked seeds and nuts then it means that they are raw. But you are saying that even dead seed can have this tiny sprout?

Alina: Viability - the ability of a seed to sprout and grow - is affected by time, temperature, and humidity.

In terms of time preventing a seed from sprouting, you can have old, raw seeds that are no longer viable.

In terms of temperature, viability can be reduced by too-hot or too-cold storage, but still not be above the "raw" temperature range.

When it comes to humidity, a seed can sprout from a little wetness but look unsprouted. When you go to sprout it, it won't grow, even though it was never heated.

The "tiny thing sticking out" of your sprouts may be a growing root, or it may be the effect of water to plump up the seed's radicula.

A good way to buy seeds for sprouting is from a company that tests for viability. The package will say something like "98% germination guaranteed." If you want to test a batch of seeds, just count out 100 seeds and sprout them; the number of seeds that germinate will give you the percentage germination rate.
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Offline van

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Re: soaking pumpkin seeds question
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2016, 03:33:48 am »
99 percent of pumkin seeds come from China, and Will Not sprout.   amazingly they are even used by companies who are selling dried sprouted seeds.
   The only ones to look for are the very dark green varieties, once mainly grown in Europe, but now being cultivated here in the us.   Nuts.com carries them.  I soak and rinse several times for 12-18 hours, and let sit on counter in collander for 12 hours, then in the fridge to slow any further sprouting ( too much and they develop a bitter taste ) and allowing them to dry, with which they become quite tasty.  They are my go to snack and almost always have them around.  An incredible source of veg nutr.

 

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