Author Topic: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked  (Read 42110 times)

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Offline Joy2012

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #100 on: September 19, 2014, 02:58:50 am »
My experiment with raw bone broth went well for 3 days. I checked the bowl every day to make sure the bones stayed underneath the heavy glass plate. Yesterday I added a stainless steel cup on top of the plate. Today my bone broth was covered with a layer of mold. Very disappointing. I inspected the chicken feet. It does not appear they have been "eaten up" in any way. They appeared intact. So there is no way to tell if they did release nutrients into the broth. I am giving up raw bone broth for the time being. Go back to cooked bone broth. Might still do vegi fermentation.

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #101 on: September 19, 2014, 07:06:47 am »
I'm sad to hear of your failure. 3 days is a very short time. I generally let mine go for weeks, and I've not had any problems with mold growing so I don't know what the deal is there. Best of luck with your cooked broth!

Offline Joy2012

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #102 on: September 19, 2014, 09:10:07 am »
Thanks, Eric.  I think the stainless steel cup brought some germs into the broth. But the main thing is that the chicken feet appeared intact after 4 days of fermenting. So I could not know if the fermenting is doing anything to release the nutrients in the bones.

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #103 on: September 19, 2014, 11:08:50 pm »
I don't think 4 days would be long enough to see much change in bones. They take a longer time to show some degradation.

Offline Joy2012

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #104 on: September 20, 2014, 02:21:21 am »
Thanks, Eric. Maybe I should try again.

Offline eveheart

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #105 on: September 20, 2014, 03:10:32 am »
Joy, I've been reading about your problem and I'm still concerned that you haven't locked out air. Here's a picture of my air lock, which lets the gas above the water level be CO2 - all air is excluded as the CO2 bubbles up to fill the space. The science of fermentation is interesting - basically, one plays with bacteria from the soil, yeasts from the air, and a few other factors (salt, temperature, sugars in foods) that moderate that game.
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Offline Hanna

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #106 on: October 01, 2014, 11:45:58 pm »
I successfully fermented white cabbage without salt. I use a trimmed cabbage leaf which fits exactly into the jar to keep the vegetable submerged.
I also prepared a raw bone broth. However, the raw bone broth tastes precisely like sauerkraut brine. Is there any trick to make it taste like bone broth?
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 11:56:11 pm by Hanna »

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #107 on: October 02, 2014, 04:21:06 am »
It won't taste exactly like cooked bone broth. If you want something that tastes like cooked bone broth, you'll need to make cooked bone broth. The raw version I noted doesn't contain as much dissolved collagen as cooked broth does, nor does it contain the array of aromatic compounds produced by heat. It just won't taste the same.

Offline Hanna

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #108 on: October 02, 2014, 06:43:45 pm »
Ok. I'll try again to get a better-tasting raw bone broth.
Joy, did you try to prepare a raw bone broth again?
Here are pictures of my white cabbage fermentation: http://frohkost.blogspot.de/2013/10/wie-bereitest-du-die-lebensmittel-zu.html

Offline Joy2012

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #109 on: October 03, 2014, 09:49:17 am »
I am successfully making fermented vegetables, thanks to all. I plan to do this regularly.

I think I will stick to cooked bone broth for the time being. I want the dissolved collagen part, which is supposed to be good for joints and skin health.

A question: I read somewhere that once you put the fermented vegetables in the refrigerator, the probiotics in the vegi die out. Is that true?

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #110 on: October 03, 2014, 10:09:34 am »
I doubt it. That contradicts what I've read. My understanding is that cool/cold temps just slow microbiota growth and hinder pathogens more than beneficial bacteria.
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Offline Joy2012

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #111 on: October 03, 2014, 11:26:54 am »
I doubt it. That contradicts what I've read. My understanding is that cool/cold temps just slow microbiota growth and hinder pathogens more than beneficial bacteria.
Thanks!

Offline Bacchal

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #112 on: October 27, 2014, 01:24:52 am »
I use a "jar in a jar method" to keep fermenting foods submerged. For example, I can fit a narrow-mouth 4 oz. canning jar into a wide-mouth canning jar (quart or larger), then  I screw a wide-mouth canning lid with an air lock, and this outer lid holds the small jar down.

I've used this method as well. I placed a tight-fitting glass within the mason jar and filled it with water to weigh it down.

Offline kalo

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #113 on: July 04, 2015, 11:44:47 pm »
I've been trying to consume bone broth for a while now. All the literature and websites recommend it as the holy grail to fixing the gut. But after multiple attempts, I can say it just tastes like burned water. My stomach feels heavy and worse. So I wonder what other ways I could get the gelatin.

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #114 on: July 05, 2015, 03:52:42 am »
I've been trying to consume bone broth for a while now. All the literature and websites recommend it as the holy grail to fixing the gut. But after multiple attempts, I can say it just tastes like burned water. My stomach feels heavy and worse. So I wonder what other ways I could get the gelatin.

Blending tendons/ligaments?

Offline eveheart

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #115 on: July 05, 2015, 06:49:26 am »
Burned water? Do you care to explain your ingredients and technique?

There are products like this one: https://www.upgradedself.com/collagelatin if you are looking for a supplement form of gelatin. It might even be sourced from grassfed cattle. (Beware of high prices on that site.)
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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #116 on: July 06, 2015, 12:01:03 am »
I've been trying to consume bone broth for a while now. All the literature and websites recommend it as the holy grail to fixing the gut....

Sort of. There is a pervasive misunderstanding among some bone brothers regarding the effects of this food on the gut. In the GAPS book and other literature Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride tries to be clear that meat stock is what heals the gut. Meat stock is made with bones and meat simmered at low temperatures for 1-2 hours. This is a very different concoction than bone broth, which is generally made of bones only and is cooked for much longer periods, often over 24 hours. If your goal is to heal your gut, you should be making meat stock, which dissolves the collagen from the meat, fascia within the meat and any cartilage and tendon that might be present on the bones. Bone broth dissolves the collagen too, but it damages it more because of the longer cooking time and also produces other cooking-derived toxins that can undermine the benefits of the broth.

You can also slice raw tendon and cartilage into bite-sized pieces and chew it up enough so you can swallow it. I make meat stock occasionally, but mostly do the latter. Not sure how good of an idea it would be to try to put raw tendons in a blender. Seems to me that might damage the blender. Tendons are very strong tissues!

Offline kalo

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Re: Bone broths best prepared raw, not cooked
« Reply #117 on: July 14, 2015, 08:22:53 am »
Wow, brilliant comment. I buy the whole carcass so there are plenty of tendons and joints. I would put them in the crock and gently brew for a day. When I consumed the broth it tastes "burned" and I feel worse. However, I recall drinking the soup after a short boiling time (because I was hungry) and liking it much more. I just never put it together.

So Eric, do you consume the meat in the meat stock or just the broth? I bet the tendons would also be easier to chew.

Second, I have an entire front leg of a lamb. I know the knee joint is good but what about that hard, thin layer of shoulder blade. Does anyone know if that is a tendon? It seemed to hard to chew and possibly to sharp.

 

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