Author Topic: High meat observations  (Read 3159 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Eric

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 985
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • EricGarza.info
High meat observations
« on: May 29, 2013, 08:12:14 am »
Hi folks, I've been eating high meat for the last few years and have generally benefitted from it, but over the last year I've noticed a couple things that I thought I'd share.

First, I notice that the only time my high meat smells bad is when I use cuts of meat that are either fatty (muscle meats) or that are high in cholesterol (heart). When I use meat that is very lean, like whitetail deer muscle or liver, the high meat doesn't smell bad no matter how long I age it. I have a jar of liver that's been aging since March 2 in my refrigerator right now, and although its clearly well-aged, when I open the jar it smells fine, with a subtle sweet odor.

Second, I notice that when I eat high meat made from fatty or high cholesterol meat, I reach the 'stop' very quickly and sometimes even have to force myself to finish eating the 1 inch cubes I cut the meat in to age it. It's far easier for me to eat aged lean meat, and I can eat aged liver in large quantities if I let myself, the stop doesn't come any sooner than if I sat down for a normal meal of liver.

Right now all of the meat I have aging is liver. It just seems to age so well for me and my body reacts so favorably to it that I can't convince myself to age anything else.

Thoughts or comments?

Eric Garza
Check out my podcast, YouTube channel , and website
Connect with me on Facebook and Instagram

Offline HIT_it_RAW

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: High meat observations
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2013, 02:27:18 pm »
Aged liver very quickly develops mold in my experience. Never ate it. Molds are a big nono as far as i'm concerned. The smell of mold is horrible to me.
“A man should be able to build a house, butcher a hog, tan the hide,
preserve the meat, deliver a baby, nurture the sick and reassure the dying, fight a war … specialization is for insects.”

Offline LePatron7

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,672
    • View Profile
Re: High meat observations
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2013, 07:14:48 pm »
I never really thought about it. But now that you mention it I was eating aged calf liver back when I didn't really like aged meats/when I was bolting it down with water. But the calf liver was really good, and I typically ate it without water. I also noticed no one complained of its smell even when I ate around them. But aged beef fat or fatty meat.. I'd never hear the end of it lol.

I haven't done high meat in a little bit, I was using fatty cuts. I think I'll try again with something leaner.
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.

Nocebo Effect - a detrimental effect on health produced by psychological or psychosomatic factors such as negative expectations of treatment or prognosis

Med free since 03/21/2014

Offline Eric

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 985
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • EricGarza.info
Re: High meat observations
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2013, 09:59:01 pm »
I think in general what makes cooked fats risky to eat is the fact that cooking oxidizes them, which does bad things to their biochemical constitutions. These same bad things happen when fats oxidize, aka go rancid. Some fats readily oxidize when in their raw state, and the oxidized versions are not so good for us either.

I'm starting to wonder if aging fatty meats might give us a dose of really bad, heavily oxidized fats. After all, one thing people say over and over with high meat is that you have to air it out, keep the aging process aerobic, which keeps the availability of oxygen high which should increase oxidation of fats. Eating aged fatty meat should deliver some benefits from the bacteria present that are eating the meat, but maybe some of those benefits are balanced by the negatives associated with eating highly oxidized (rancid) fats? This is me just thinking out loud. Others are welcome to offer thoughts on the issue.
 
Eric Garza
Check out my podcast, YouTube channel , and website
Connect with me on Facebook and Instagram

Offline LePatron7

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,672
    • View Profile
Re: High meat observations
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2013, 11:05:16 pm »
I think a little bit of oxidized cholesterol/fat from aged fatty meat wouldn't be as bad as the cooked version. I'm sure a lot of times animals come across carcasses that have been there for a while and eat it.
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.

Nocebo Effect - a detrimental effect on health produced by psychological or psychosomatic factors such as negative expectations of treatment or prognosis

Med free since 03/21/2014

Offline Eric

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 985
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • EricGarza.info
Re: High meat observations
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2013, 12:03:11 am »
They certainly do. That doesn't necessarily mean doing so is ideal for them, or us.
Eric Garza
Check out my podcast, YouTube channel , and website
Connect with me on Facebook and Instagram

Offline PaleoPhil

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 6,198
  • Gender: Male
  • Mad scientist (not into blind Paleo re-enactment)
    • View Profile
Re: High meat observations
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2013, 07:24:53 am »
Some Things Fishy: Oxidized Fish Oil Totally Benign!? Plus: The Inflammatory Side of EPA and Peroxide & Alkenal Levels in Commercial Fish and Vegetable Oils
By Adel Moussa
http://suppversity.blogspot.com/2011/12/some-things-fishy-oxidized-fish-oil.html
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk