Author Topic: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?  (Read 8087 times)

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Offline zaidi

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Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« on: October 16, 2013, 01:34:15 pm »
Recently I got chance to eat wild deer Suet and Bone Marrow. It was tasty and one cannot compare it to grain fed animal suet and  bone marrow.

But then yesterday I got the suet and bone marrow from one butcher, and it was 100% grass fed. And I found the taste and quality was even better than the wild one.

Wild suet was only 20% yellow, but grass fed suet was 50-60% yellow, and it was very very oily and soft like cream (while the wild one was much harder).

What is your experience? Is it possible that a grass fed cattle could beat the quality of wild meat/suet?

Offline svrn

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2013, 02:38:52 pm »
its a case by case basis.
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Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2013, 03:46:12 pm »
That surprises me. I have never once come across wild meats that were inferior to grassfed meats.
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2013, 06:57:21 pm »
I suspect that the suet hardness and lack of connective tissue and brown bits is actually a sign of good health. Some of the worst suet I've had was not 100% grassfed and yet was the most yellow I'd ever seen (it even said right on the package that they fed their animals all organic grain, which they were proud of--I'm guessing that yellow corn may have contributed to the yellowness, like it can in chicken eggs http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/07/12/201501977/help-my-egg-yolks-are-freakishly-white). It was also softer, and more mealy, more like sawdust in the mouth, than the rock hard white deer suet and 100% grassfed suet, which was more waxy and tastier.

Yellowness does not guarantee 100% grassfed nor animal health, nor does whiteness guarantee grain fed nor ill health. I received confirmation of this from a 100% grassfed farm whose suet is the best I've tried in stores and is more white and harder than cheap grainfed supermarket suet, and posted about it before. For some reason, no one will believe this. The best tasting suet, with the best mouth feel, I've had was from a wild deer and was pure, solid white and rock hard, with no visible connective tissue or brown bits in it at all. I think I posted a photo of it.

I recall Lex suspecting that US Wellness farms meat was not truly 100% grassfed because the fat was less yellow than others. The owner was adamant that it is 100% grassfed, but it seemed that some folks wouldn't believe him because of this notion that yellowness=grassfed. I don't like their fat as much as the best fat in local markets, which is even less yellow than that of US Wellness, but what he said fit with everything else I've learned.

The more I think about it, the more it makes sense that the suet of healthy wild animals would be harder and purer, with less connective tissue in it, than that of grassfed domesticated animals. It fits with the general tendency for things to be in the wrong places in sickly animals and people--such as intramuscular fat in the muscles, tumors in the brain containing bone, teeth, hair, etc.--and with what I find to be softer muscle tissue in the lean portion of grainfed meats. I find grassfed and wild meats to be firmer, leaner and darker red, with less fat in the muscle and less connective tissue in the fat. Which would you rather have, fatty muscles and a soft midsection with soft perinephric fat ("suet") protecting the organs and a flabby belly, or lean, hard muscles and a rock-hard midsection that can take a punch?

Whiteness is probably also not a guarantee of quality and health, but so far I've been finding that the whiter the suet, the better. I know, I know, that's heresy on teh Interwebs.  -d
« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 08:43:18 pm by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
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Offline van

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2013, 09:58:19 pm »
US wellness wet ages their beef, which has a tremendous detrimental effect on it's taste and appearance.

Offline van

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2013, 09:59:02 pm »
That should have read effect on the fat.

Offline Dr. D

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2013, 12:28:05 am »
What I've noticed for fat, if the animal was grainfed, the fat gets a "farmy " taste. It tastes how the inside of a barnyard smells. Not good.

Beyond that there is variation in animal to animal, breed, season, grass type, nutrients in the soil, and all these affect the animal, especially the fat.

I'm positive my beef is 100% grassfed, the fat is really good, especially the marrow, and always white.
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Offline LePatron7

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2013, 09:44:36 am »
Recently I got chance to eat wild deer Suet and Bone Marrow. It was tasty and one cannot compare it to grain fed animal suet and  bone marrow.

But then yesterday I got the suet and bone marrow from one butcher, and it was 100% grass fed. And I found the taste and quality was even better than the wild one.

Wild suet was only 20% yellow, but grass fed suet was 50-60% yellow, and it was very very oily and soft like cream (while the wild one was much harder).

What is your experience? Is it possible that a grass fed cattle could beat the quality of wild meat/suet?

It's possible for the beef it was more muscle meat trimmings. Every suet I've ever gotten has been hard and chalky. While the beef fat trimmings I get are often very yellow, and very soft.
Disclaimer: I was told I was misdiagnosed over 10 years ago, and I haven't taken any medication in over a decade.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2013, 09:30:30 pm »
DaBoss, had the suet you tried been frozen at all and have you ever tried suet from a wild animal?

US wellness wet ages their beef, which has a tremendous detrimental effect on it's taste and appearance.
Thanks for that info, Van. I looked it up and found that US Wellness not only wet ages, but that wet aging is typically done in plastic packaging. Yuck! That might explain why I didn't like their pemmican that I tried a long while ago (didn't like their tallow either), and maybe partly explain why their pemmican molded so readily, though their tallow did too and my guess would be that they wouldn't bother to age tallow, but they do also store it in plastic. I think someone explained the tallow molding as probably caused by the fat still containing a fair amount of moisture, or gathering it during frozen storage, IIRC.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2013, 09:46:24 pm by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline LePatron7

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2013, 11:49:04 pm »
DaBoss, had the suet you tried been frozen at all and have you ever tried suet from a wild animal?

I've gotten unfrozen suet from Miller's, that's the hard chalky fat I was referencing to. The beef fat I get (whether frozen from White Oak Pastures or unfrozen from Miller's) has always been very soft, and typically very yellow (unless it's winter, then it's white and a little harder, but not as hard as suet).
Disclaimer: I was told I was misdiagnosed over 10 years ago, and I haven't taken any medication in over a decade.

Offline van

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2013, 12:03:00 am »
DaBoss, had the suet you tried been frozen at all and have you ever tried suet from a wild animal?
Thanks for that info, Van. I looked it up and found that US Wellness not only wet ages, but that wet aging is typically done in plastic packaging. Yuck! That might explain why I didn't like their pemmican that I tried a long while ago (didn't like their tallow either), and maybe partly explain why their pemmican molded so readily, though their tallow did too and my guess would be that they wouldn't bother to age tallow, but they do also store it in plastic. I think someone explained the tallow molding as probably caused by the fat still containing a fair amount of moisture, or gathering it during frozen storage, IIRC.

Right,  I ordered about 40 pounds of fat from them once, it was all grey, and smelly.  I ended up throwing it away.  I had the hardest time understanding how they thought someone would want to pay for it?  That's when I learned it was wet aged, plastic, etc.  all to reduce the amount of shrinkage or weight loss due to evaporation, thus loss of profit. 

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2013, 01:59:07 am »
I've gotten unfrozen suet from Miller's, that's the hard chalky fat I was referencing to. The beef fat I get (whether frozen from White Oak Pastures or unfrozen from Miller's) has always been very soft, and typically very yellow (unless it's winter, then it's white and a little harder, but not as hard as suet).
Yes, suet is supposed to be hard. If you don't mind hard fat on occasion and want to see what the best suet is like, try wild suet, such as from a fairly young deer (especially what paleoanthropologists call "prime-aged" animals (or younger)--the youngest and choicest tasting of full grown animals, rather than the ones with the biggest trophy antlers). I find it waxy, rather than chalky, and think of it as like natural beeswax or chicle. I also find that if I chew suet long enough and it's good quality suet, it becomes sweet, akin to lightly sweetened chicle or beeswax gum. Suet and natural chicle also clean my teeth nicely. Perhaps these are a couple reasons why traditional peoples "chewed the fat."

Wild suet also holds together rather well, so it can be used as a good skin oiler/lotioner akin to a stick of cocoa butter without falling apart too badly. The better quality farmed suets do a decent job as well.

Right,  I ordered about 40 pounds of fat from them once, it was all grey, and smelly.  I ended up throwing it away.  I had the hardest time understanding how they thought someone would want to pay for it?  That's when I learned it was wet aged, plastic, etc.  all to reduce the amount of shrinkage or weight loss due to evaporation, thus loss of profit.
Ah, yes, that probably explains why my pemmican order was grey too upon receipt, even though it hadn't spoiled (at first). I thought maybe the animals were anemic (when it comes to beef, I look for the bloodiest-red beef I can find), or perhaps they dried the beef at unusually high temps, but now I see that it was likely due to the wet aging. What a shame that they ruin good meat and fat that way. Thanks for the info.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2013, 02:17:17 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline ys

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2013, 02:58:24 am »
I find young deer suet to be the most unpleasant.  Beef or buffalo suet is so much better.

Offline svrn

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #13 on: October 20, 2013, 03:26:24 am »
animal products+plastic=botulism

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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #14 on: October 20, 2013, 03:56:32 am »
Yup
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline paper_clips43

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #15 on: October 20, 2013, 04:37:00 am »
Could just be the plastic in general. I have heard of people getting botulism from canned peaches. I am assuming it was a BPA lined can.
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2013, 10:55:52 pm »
I think cases of botulism from infected cans predated the use of BPA in cans and BPA actually apparently lowers the risk of botulism:

http://www.shopfloor.org/2010/11/flash-hot-news-bpa-prevents-food-borne-illness/15722

So the problem seems to be with metal and non-BPA plastic containers/packaging that allow only enough air in to infect the food, but also inhibit oxygen enough to enable the pathogenic bacteria to survive, and maybe they do something else as well.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline svrn

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Re: Grassfed Suet better than Wild Suet?
« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2013, 01:26:46 am »
all plastics have some form of phytoestrogen in them. They are all toxic. THis fixation on bpa is quite silly and exhibited in the bpa hysteria of a few years back where all the companies started putting wedont use bpa on their products to increase sales.

what the customer doesnt know is that most of that bpa was replaced with other plastics that realease even more phytoestrogens into your food.
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