Author Topic: liver spots, moles  (Read 7499 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline littleElefant

  • Buffalo Hunter
  • ***
  • Posts: 120
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
liver spots, moles
« on: August 12, 2015, 08:45:42 pm »
Hi
Hi :)
last year I started to develope lots of liver spots mainly under the breast, (I made fotos but dont know how to put them in the script?)
I eate a lot of fish; some meat and a lot of beef fat, some butter and avocado loads of eggs, mainly low carb and I eate a lot I never had liver spots at all before and now I have thousands and that feels very strange I would like to know the reason because it continues; I develope new ones almost every other day?
My doctor told me it is normal and I should take vitamin D
I think it has something to do with my liver Perhaps my liver is still clogged? Perhaps I eat too much fats, too much beef fat or too much pufas, too much protein, to much food in general because of trying to gain weight, late time eating, frozen fat or protein, butter, eggs, I dont know what is the cause Does somebody else recognises this kind of symtoms, or has an idea where it could come from and what to do about it?
In december I had an antibiotique treatment because of ulcers, heliobacter pylori, perhaps it damaged something?


Offline nummi

  • Warrior
  • ****
  • Posts: 249
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2015, 11:41:38 pm »
Overeating possibly.
How much do you eat a day?
The more active you are the more you'll need, but if you're not as active as the amount eaten suggests then you're overeating.

I'm ~192cm, ~80kg. Presently on average about 5 eggs a day, 60g beef fat, 150g beef meat, 20g liver, 20g honey, lots of fresh berries (sometimes too much... black currants are really good, there's something very great about them), some greens and other stuff. Don't know exact amounts as I don't count, but roughly so.
If I did less exercise, and less picking berries and stuff, I'd need less food.

Offline raw-al

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,956
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2015, 03:49:28 am »
If they truly are liver spots, then do coffee enemas. They are simple and will do you a world of good. Lots of YTs on them and articles online.

The liver is also the seat of emotions. Was there some emotional upset prior to the start of the spots??? AFAIAC the emotional upset is the bottom of the problem, which starts the cascade which causes them and probably other things. However a clean diet will slow down the process significantly.

Milk thistle is also very good for cleansing the liver. Eating exclusively raw will definitely help. Avoid coffee and tea as it seems to make it worse. I am also prone to get them (runs in family) and I have nowhere near as many as my family, as I have a cleaner diet. I used a Rife machine (like Spooky 2) to improve my liver.

To post photos, first hit the preview button (which also brings up the attachment menu)

Then click on the "Attachments and other options" button which is below the place where you type in your reply.

This will bring down a menu which amount other things tells you that the files must be of the following size and file type. File type means the three or four letters after the name of the file.

"Allowed file types: doc, gif, jpg, mpg, pdf, png, txt
Restrictions: 20 per post, maximum total size 4096KB, maximum individual size 3072KB"
Cheers
Al

Offline sabertooth

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,007
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2015, 07:16:58 am »
Conditions such as Ulcers and liver congestion could point to a food intolerance issue, or perhaps a food combination problem. Eating a high fat and high protein diet can be very beneficial in some circumstances, as long as you are absolutely sure about the quality, and are eating a variety of different types of meat and organs...... but if you are mixing up foods which are not compatible, then you may have problems.

Try to identify and eliminate possible problem foods, dairy is always at the top of the list to look out for! Dairy always causes me to become liver congested, raw milk is the worst, but even butter and cheese cause issues if I eat it regularly.

Other foods like fermented vegetables, fruits, starches are not compatible with a high fat and protein diet especially  in people with digestive enzyme insufficiency.

You've posted about being borderline diabetic, which can indicate pancreatic enzyme deficiency, perhaps eating small amounts of pancreas regularly would help, and if you couldn't find it you may consider using an animal derived panacetin supplement.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2015, 07:24:07 am by sabertooth »
A man who makes a beast of himself, forgets the pain of being a man.

Offline RogueFarmer

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 570
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2015, 10:56:16 am »
Is it not possible that is is from the body cleansing itself or caused by a past issue and not one in the present?

Offline cherimoya_kid

  • One who bans trolls
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 4,513
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2015, 11:45:40 am »
Is it not possible that is is from the body cleansing itself or caused by a past issue and not one in the present?

Possible, but I think she has done extended periods of raw food eating for years, so it's very unlikely.

Offline jessica

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,016
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2015, 11:48:18 am »
too much of one amino acid over another, maybe try milk or anything with lysine and luecine over arginine??  too much copper not enough zinc? 

Offline PaleoPhil

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 6,198
  • Gender: Male
  • Mad scientist (not into blind Paleo re-enactment)
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2015, 07:08:45 pm »
Suddenly getting thousands of liver spots, with more developing, is not normal. Maybe seek a second opinion about them? Was there a specific reason the MD recommended vitamin D, such as being found to be deficient?

Liver spots are not directly linked to the liver. They involve the accumulation of "lipofuscin bodies in a fibrotic capsule" --

"The spots derive their name from the fact that they were once incorrectly believed to be caused by liver problems, but they are physiologically unrelated to the liver, save for a similar color"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liver_spot#Causes

If they are "liver spots" (aka "age spots"), then it would seem to make sense to study people who have reached advanced ages without age spots. One such person is Fred Kummerow. He is over 100 years of age and doesn't have a single age spot. Here is some info on Fred, including the basics of his diet:

http://www.perceivethinkact.com/blog/urbana-august-20th-2014

More discussion of Fred here:
https://youtu.be/cY0QqoJM7LU?t=1724

Ray Peat also doesn't appear to have any age spots and has similar views.

Here are some age-spot tips that are based on Ray Peat's ideas:

5 Ways to Prevent Age Spots
http://www.thankyourbody.com/prevent-age-spots

A couple more elders without age spots or skin blemishes are a near-rawist centenarian, Bernando Lapallo (GS posted about him before), and raw vegan Annette Larkin.

Amazing 108 Years Old and Healthy! Part 1 of 3
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mj7knA3-YUs

Can You Guess Her Age? -- Raw Vegan Diet Is Woman's Fountain of Youth
WPTV News | West Palm Beach Florida
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6oJA_xhTa8

Of course, some people will doubt these people's claims, so do your own research, such as learning about what causes age spots. Too much PUFAs has indeed been linked to age spots.

> "Age pigment is the brown material that forms spots on aging skin, and that accumulates in the lens of the eye forming cataracts, and in blood vessels causing hardening of the arteries, and in the heart and brain and other organs, causing their functions to deteriorate with age. It is made up of oxidized unsaturated oils with iron."
> "The technical name for this material, "lipofuscin," means "fatty brown stuff.""
http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/iron-dangers.shtml

Age pigment: Cause and Effect of Aging and Stress
http://www.artcamp.com.mx/EZINES/30OpeningEyes/7/aging&stress.htm

http://beautyeditor.ca/2014/02/17/cause-of-skin-aging

http://www.functionalps.com/blog/2012/04/23/unsaturated-fats-and-age-pigment

In december I had an antibiotique treatment because of ulcers, heliobacter pylori, perhaps it damaged something?
I don't know, but since I started consuming more prebiotic foods, a few people have commented that I look younger, and other people have reported this same effect. It was unexpected.

I also find that clay makes my skin and hair feel younger and even seems to reduce muscle tension. Thanks again to Ingrid for the clay "shampoo" tip.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline sabertooth

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,007
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2015, 10:16:29 pm »
Perhaps these fatty pigmented spots serve a biological function, such as encapsulating toxic substances, or they contain aberrant cells, that if let free would move through the body causing havoc? 
A man who makes a beast of himself, forgets the pain of being a man.

Offline jessica

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,016
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2015, 11:22:43 pm »
theres something to do with vitamin d and calcium causing skin issues too, i forget what the mechanism is bt its about not getting the right forms of these or not being able to convert them into the right forms.  in trying to gain weight have you worked with any mental health issues you have such as anxiety to help to calm the brain and body?  if you can eat butter is it possible that you can eat other forms of raw dairy? they are good for weight gain.

Offline Hanna

  • Shaman
  • *****
  • Posts: 424
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2015, 09:41:18 pm »
Skin moles don’t have to be a bad thing:

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-11813378

Just saying.

Offline cherimoya_kid

  • One who bans trolls
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 4,513
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2015, 10:12:27 pm »
Skin moles don’t have to be a bad thing:

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-11813378

Just saying.

Interesting article, but we don't have any pictures of her skin yet, so they might be liver spots, not moles.

Offline PaleoPhil

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 6,198
  • Gender: Male
  • Mad scientist (not into blind Paleo re-enactment)
    • View Profile
Re: liver spots, moles
« Reply #12 on: August 17, 2015, 03:44:32 am »
Yes, so far there is just one doctor's reported opinion that the spots are normal. Did he specify that they are liver spots and moles?

If many are moles, then common practice when there are many new ones is to have a dermatologist check them out, to see if there is any melanoma or other skin issues, particularly if any have an unusual appearance.

FWIW, when I went Paleo, some of my moles started to shrink, fade, become smoother, and some even disappeared. There have been no new ones since.

The longer telomere and delayed aging finding in mole-producing people is interesting, though the increased cancer rates are sobering. Maybe the best of both worlds would be to have the capacity to produce moles and also a healthy diet and lifestyle that doesn't generate the toxins to produce moles, as well as a well-functioning system that can produce and use energy efficiently without generating much toxic byproducts in the process?
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk