Author Topic: PaleoPhil's Journal  (Read 272631 times)

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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #625 on: September 04, 2012, 09:46:18 am »
Warning to sensitive raw Paleo purists, the following report may be upsetting:  >:  :o

It's hard to tell with accurate detail, but adding or increasing these foods seems to have provided more benefits to my dental health than just raw Paleo or raw Paleo plus RF CLO, vitamin D gels, minerals and Oxysulfur:

sardine soup  (heated in a crockpot on the warm setting)
marrow bone broth (heated in a crockpot on the warm setting)
liver cooked in bacon and garlic (I found it hard to get myself to eat enough raw, whereas cooked bacon and garlic give it a flavor that entices me to eat more)

This doesn't mean I think that humans are coctivores. Rather, the bone, joint, skin, and organ elements that these foods provide are less commonly available in raw foods and less enticing to my palate amongst the raw foods, so these are substitutes, and I have more dental and other damage to reverse than Paleolithic peoples normally would have had.

Plus I increased some of my raw Paleo foods:
raw fertilized eggs
raw suet (my intake had dropped and I ramped it back up after my dental health declined some)

The latter two foods seem to be my most beneficial so far.

I often notice less "dental crud", as you call it, the morning after eating some cooked food.

I fear the cooked food is just delaying the detox process. I don't think it provides any health benefits.

Are your experiences different?

Offline aLptHW4k4y

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #626 on: September 04, 2012, 04:27:35 pm »
I've similarly noticed some increased dental health by eating cooked chicken bones from time to time. With some vinegar added and a bit of time, they soften and disolve at very low temperatures (I also put it on warm in the crockpot), so I don't think it's nearly bad as cooking can be (boiling, steaming, etc).

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #627 on: September 05, 2012, 06:05:15 am »
I often notice less "dental crud", as you call it, the morning after eating some cooked food.

I fear the cooked food is just delaying the detox process. I don't think it provides any health benefits.

Are your experiences different?
Yes, quite different. I notice plenty of dental crud from cooked foods other than those I mentioned and I've already experienced benefits since eating more of the foods I mentioned--a healing cavity, reduced gum inflammation, teeth that feel polished--and some that I didn't mention already, like less lower extremity edema, improved sleep, and feeling improved overall.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2012, 06:26:07 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Dorothy

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #628 on: September 06, 2012, 07:12:16 am »
Next time I'm at a real loss for an insult, I'm going to call someone a "dirty coctivore" for kicks.

I've been making Brian slow cooked soups with marrow bone and seafood including scallops because I can't get him to eat it any other way. It sits with me quite well. 

I love how honest, open and truthful you are about your experiments on yourself Phil.

Thanks for that!

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #629 on: September 06, 2012, 07:35:35 am »
You're welcome, Dorothy, and thanks for understanding that I'm not trying to diss raw.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #630 on: September 06, 2012, 07:39:36 am »
Yes, quite different. I notice plenty of dental crud from cooked foods other than those I mentioned and I've already experienced benefits since eating more of the foods I mentioned--a healing cavity, reduced gum inflammation, teeth that feel polished--and some that I didn't mention already, like less lower extremity edema, improved sleep, and feeling improved overall.

My mind is still open on the issue.

I will say that a universal issue with cooked food is a lack of aerobic stamina.  Eating a particular food raw instead of cooked will nearly always be better for aerobic stamina.

As for the specific foods you're trying, I'd watch carefully for this issue.  My guess is that, if you find it affecting your aerobic stamina, you may be causing some more hidden, gradual health issues.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #631 on: September 06, 2012, 07:59:19 am »
I will say that a universal issue with cooked food is a lack of aerobic stamina.  Eating a particular food raw instead of cooked will nearly always be better for aerobic stamina.
I believe it, that's why I only use cooking where raw just doesn't prove practical or sufficient for me for whatever reason, such as the fact that I don't eat much of whole animal carcasses the way our ancestors likely would have. These cooked foods are stand-ins for me for certain raw ancestral foods that some people like myself otherwise wouldn't eat a lot of nowadays if we tried to eat 100% raw. Plus, I have particular dental issues that are rather high priority for me that these foods seem to be helping with. I'll take improved health over purity any day. KD, Lex, Dorothy and others seem to have a similar view on this (please correct me if I'm wrong).

Quote
As for the specific foods you're trying, I'd watch carefully for this issue.  My guess is that, if you find it affecting your aerobic stamina, you may be causing some more hidden, gradual health issues.
Thanks, haven't noticed that, luckily. As Lex says, if I notice any negative effects, I'll make a change. Coincidentally, Lex recently reported adding bouillon cubes and bouillon concentrate in heated broths and salt to his diet. I think I've mentioned it before, but I also occasionally add some unheated natural salt to some foods. It made some sense given that a chiropractor told me that I had an abnormally low sodium level based on a test he did and given that I don't eat much salt-containing blood like our ancestors likely did, plus reports by several sources that too-low salt levels can be harmful in the long run, and it adds a touch of taste variety that's pleasant, though not a necessity for me.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2012, 08:19:08 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Dorothy

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #632 on: September 07, 2012, 07:33:20 am »
Realized after typing it all that the following post is quite long. Please let me know if you want me to edit it down for your journal Phil:
 

Yes Phil what you say is true for me. It's all about improving health and letting go of all preconceived ideas and beliefs to find out what actually works in the here and now with life and food as we can find it, afford it and tolerate it. Because we are not in raw paleo societies having eaten that way our whole lives we have to figure out what works the best for ourselves as individuals not only physically, but also in terms of our general life choices and needs. We all come to this diet with different genetics and histories and goals.

We were not raised raw paleo so that changes for us how we perceive different foods like organs taste-wise. I have very little access to organs and what I do have is frozen. Just like our ancestors we have to work with what we can get. In some ways, we're pretty lucky having the variety and resources that we do, in other ways we have more challenges. I'm pretty sure that fresh blood, organs and marrow taken directly out of a wild animal eaten warm on the spot after a lifetime of hunting along with everyone else would be a different experience than what we have to work with. 

I like how you look at trying to get as close as you can to what a complete paleo diet would have been in terms of making sure you are getting all the necessary components with as much raw as you can within the context of your life. You've taught me a great deal in this regard. Is it better to eat all raw and leave out some of the mainstay elements that our paleolithic ancestors would have had in their diets or is it better to use mild heat with water to make sure you get those elements? I think that is the question you are exploring here.

I can appreciate what you are doing completely. I know that if you ever were in a situation where you could get as much of these things as you need raw and fresh and could chew and tolerate them, you would choose that. You know that you are eating in a way that would not be the first choice if all other factors were lined up - but you ARE reaching your goals! That's what's really important.  Congratulations!

This discussion has made me think more about what I have available. The only whole animals I can get are Slanker's dog food and sometimes a whole fish. Neither Brian nor I can tolerate (modern wimps that we are) eating either of these things raw. But, now I have started to think that maybe if I could put these in a crockpot (not just the marrow and the meat of frozen seafood like I have been) it might be a very good way to get all the organs of the animals and minerals from bone that we are so sorely lacking in our diets right now. This way we could get the cartilage, the eyes, the brains, the adrenals - everything! We get none of these things now. Of course it isn't the best.... but I am starting to think that it's better than not having these things in our diets at all. I'm going to add Slanker's dog food along with the marrow bones to our next soup to try it! I'm going to put a whole fish in there when one is available. I'm going to try blending the fish like has recently been suggested elsewhere on the forum, but then adding it to the crock pot. I never thought of this before. Just adding the scallops and marrow into our diets seems to help Brian a good deal - imagine what getting all those organs might do!?

Just like it would be better if I had rain water, but I don't. So, instead I've been trying to think what I can do to create the best construction/compromise that I can. I think about what would be in rain water. Water on the earth would have lots of minerals - so I have to add clay and take minerals. Rain water would have hydrogen peroxide in it where my water doesn't, so I am starting to add a tiny bit of h202 to my water in order to approximate. I'm not out searching for food getting exercise so I have my exercise machine. I'm not sleeping on uneven ground so I have my bed at an incline. Sure I would be better off living truly naturally - but I'm doing the best I can to recreate the fundamentals within the context of my modern life.

Most everything -- if we are not living outside, sleeping on the ground, living naked in the sun  and hunting down our food full time in a pristine environment -- is an approximation -- acts of just trying to get a bit closer to things that we know are lacking to create health.

If it's working - it's working. It's good to be grateful for anything we can find or do that actually works!

I think of this as a place where people come to share what they've tried and report what has worked and what has not - as a kind of collective experiment. But often we don't know when something stopped working for someone. I appreciate that you keep on coming back and updating the changes to your diet and their effects over time.
 

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #633 on: September 15, 2012, 09:10:42 pm »
I think I've mentioned it before, but I also occasionally add some unheated natural salt to some foods. It made some sense given that a chiropractor told me that I had an abnormally low sodium level based on a test he did and given that I don't eat much salt-containing blood like our ancestors likely did, plus reports by several sources that too-low salt levels can be harmful in the long run, and it adds a touch of taste variety that's pleasant, though not a necessity for me.

I do use salt every once in a while.  I do notice that my taste for it goes away after a few days, only to come back after a few months.  I imagine my use of salt has become pretty instinctive, and that my taste for it pretty closely mirrors my need for it.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #634 on: October 30, 2012, 09:24:31 am »
I thought that too until I was tested. Of course, there's the possibility that what are considered "normal" salt levels are actually too high or that the test was faulty.

I discovered what looks like Japanese barberry by the river today (unfortunately, if so, it's an invasive plant). Its berries were pretty tasty; nicely tart with some sweetness. They are reportedly very high in vitamin C.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2012, 09:31:31 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #635 on: November 21, 2012, 07:51:11 am »
Recently, my feet have been stronger, not becoming as easily injured from walking barefoot or in barefoot-style shoes on hard surfaces like cement. I have been consuming more bone broths/stews/soups recently (not heated above the "warm" setting of my crockpot). Whether this is coincidence or something more, I do not know. It is a blessing either way.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #636 on: January 08, 2013, 08:29:59 am »
Yesterday and today I tried testing my blood oxygen saturation level with a pulse oximeter for the first time in quite a while and it's up another notch to consistently 99%, vs. in the past when it was usually 98% (though occasionally 99%). Here's to hoping that I can hit Dorothy's 100% level in the future.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #637 on: January 08, 2013, 11:52:37 pm »
Yesterday and today I tried testing my blood oxygen saturation level with a pulse oximeter for the first time in quite a while and it's up another notch to consistently 99%, vs. in the past when it was usually 98% (though occasionally 99%). Here's to hoping that I can hit Dorothy's 100% level in the future.

I used to work with a woman who smoked, but whose blood oxygen levels were consistently around 99-100%, whereas mine (at the time--I was raw vegan) were around 97%-98%.

Embarrassing.  ROFL

I'm not sure whether that shows that the raw vegan diet is kind of a failure, or that her genetics were just better.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #638 on: January 09, 2013, 09:06:40 am »
Interesting. Thanks for sharing that. How often did she smoke? It's also curious that my blood oxygen level improved even though I've been consuming some coffee and butter, which contain the dreaded AGEs. It has been hypothesized that low levels of all sorts of deadly poisons can actually improve the health, depending on the individual, even small amounts of smoking have been connected to improved health, though I don't recall if it was in humans or lab rats.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #639 on: January 09, 2013, 11:20:02 am »
Interesting. Thanks for sharing that. How often did she smoke? It's also curious that my blood oxygen level improved even though I've been consuming some coffee and butter, which contain the dreaded AGEs. It has been hypothesized that low levels of all sorts of deadly poisons can actually improve the health, depending on the individual, even small amounts of smoking have been connected to improved health, though I don't recall if it was in humans or lab rats.

I don't know if she inhaled or not.  I didn't watch her closely when she smoked.  People who don't inhale generally don't have nearly as much lung damage and other health problems.

As to how often, probably at least half a pack a day, if I had to guess. 

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #640 on: March 24, 2013, 01:16:53 am »
I tried raw Brazil nuts because of high selenium content, as a relatively healthful and convenient snack food for work, and as a diet expander/diversifier (for a number of reasons). I discovered an unexpected benefit from it--it works better on constipation for me than anything else I've tried (and I've tried a lot). I hadn't seen this connection made before, so my openness to continued personal experimentation paid off.

For me, raw Brazil nuts have been much more gentle and effective than the legume fruit cassia fistula that has been touted by some at this forum. They also worked much better than raw cashew nuts, though those also provided some benefit. The downside of Brazil nuts is that they are excessively high in omega 6 fat and selenium and addictive, so there's the possibility of overdoing it. Thus, I try not to buy too much at once.

My recent dental visit was excellent. I was a bit concerned, because I went nearly 7 months between cleanings instead of the usual 3, which is the longest I've gone in quite some time, but I still had less dental plaque, bleeding and pain (almost no pain at all and the cleaning actually felt good at times, like a gum massage) than in years past at 3-month cleanings. Still no sign of worsening of my dental carie (a dentist told me to get it filled back in 2008 and said that it would get very bad soon if I didn't), though it didn't improve any further this time, like it had at the last visit. So bone broths/soups/stews and animal fats, including even butter, still seem to be quite beneficial for my dental health.

My dentist recommended coconut oil swishing/pulling. I had forgotten about my coconut oil (a centrifuged version by Wilderness Family Naturals that is less heated and tastier than pressed extra virgin olive oils), because I was keeping it in the cupboard. I decided to keep it in my bathroom as a daily reminder. It works better than mouthwash. By accident I found that leaving cut up coconut meat on the kitchen counter instead of the fridge dries it nicely, preserving it better than refrigeration (where mold is a big risk) and making it a bit tastier and easier to digest than fresh coconut.

Butter coffee and butter tea seem to have made maintaining dental health easier for me and I think they were the key addition that enabled me to go 4 more months between cleanings. I don't claim that they are raw Paleo or optimal, but they are another convenient way for me to keep my intake of animal fat up. I do minimize the heating--just enough to be able to melt the butter in a reasonable amount of time. I buy lightly roasted whole coffee beans, soak them overnight in a French press, then lightly heat it in the microwave and add butter. I tend to heat the tea more to make a black tea (usually assam tea, aka "breakfast tea") strong enought that it will keep some tea flavor with butter added. I may start soaking that overnight too at some point to reduce the amount of heating necessary. Interestingly, the less I heat coffee or tea, the less belching it causes. On days I drink butter coffee/tea my teeth are squeaky clean, like I just got home from the dentist's office (and even cleaner if I eat plenty of raw suet instead or in addition).

I'm digesting raw sauerkraut better and enjoying it more, especially with Gold's home style horseradish added. Now I understand first-hand why some people love sauerkraut so much. It required some adaptation, I hope beneficial, for me.

I love the way that raw parsnips get my saliva juices flowing and spices up my saliva, enabling me to savor the spicey parsnip flavor well after I've finished eating them. The thicker parts of parsnip roots are less tasty, so I throw those in the slow cooker (I know, evil cooking) along with other veggie scraps and bones to make bone broths/soups. I think I'll start experimenting with soaking my broths too, to see how little cooking I can get away with and still get a decent broth out of it.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline aLptHW4k4y

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #641 on: March 24, 2013, 02:17:27 am »
PaleoPhil, what do you mean by teeth cleaning? I don't remember ever doing any teeth cleaning, when I go to the dentist he checks if any fillings are necessary or not and that's about it.

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #642 on: March 24, 2013, 06:13:58 am »
Are you gaining any weight?

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #643 on: March 25, 2013, 03:25:04 am »
PaleoPhil, what do you mean by teeth cleaning? I don't remember ever doing any teeth cleaning, when I go to the dentist he checks if any fillings are necessary or not and that's about it.
Doesn't the hygienist clean your teeth before the dentist checks them? They use various implements, so it depends on whatever that particular office uses. At the one I'm currently going to, the hygienist uses a high-pressure water-pik-type device, then some plaque scraping/scaling and probing with metal devices, then flossing, then probing for cavities, and then the dentist follows up with probing and looking for issues, usually confirming what the hygienist reports.

Are you gaining any weight?
Not recently. My budget is real tight since I bought a condo, so that hasn't been a focus lately.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2013, 03:31:23 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #644 on: March 25, 2013, 11:50:09 pm »
Quote
Not recently. My budget is real tight since I bought a condo, so that hasn't been a focus lately.

Awesome time to buy property.  Congrats!

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #645 on: March 26, 2013, 05:27:35 am »
Thanks
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #646 on: March 31, 2013, 03:05:45 am »
Quote
“Life’s Mysteries" by Kun-Gay Yap in Reality Beyond Belief: Understanding Why You Believe What You Believe:

"There is so much we could or should know but each of us has only the slightest sliver of what there is to know. This individual ignorance ensures that most of existence is a mystery for each of us, creating much awe and wonder even though it is everyday knowledge for others. The compulsion to solve such ‘mysteries’ ensures the invention of belief even though there exists quite ordinary explanations. Such ‘mysteries’ excite the mind, and the ‘solutions’ which we so ably discover or invent, please the brain.* Many fanciful and thrilling explanations are invented and held as glorious truths even though the facts are plain and mundane."

[* Footnote: "The most preposterous inventions tend to attract the most devout belief. Later a parallel is drawn between such unlikely beliefs and a high-risk gamble which may have a huge payout. Some of them may even be Black Swan events, (a theory of unexpected yet world-changing events developed by Nassim Nicholas Taleb in his book The Black Swan.) Also look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_swan_theory.”]
I find that recognizing the infinite complexity of the universe, being able to accept the fact of my general ignorance, and questioning assumptions (including my own) helps to avoid this error.

Quote
"{O}ne must attend in medical practice not primarily to plausible theories but to experience combined with reason." - Hippocrates, Precepts, Ch. 1, as translated by W. H. S. Jones (1923).
This quote matches my general experience. While I enjoy learning about scientific research and theories and know they have their place, I have actually benefited much more from keeping an open and questioning mind, not blindly accepting views that are commonplace among scientists as dogma, from observations and self-reports of people's actual experience, especially time-tested heuristics that fit into the evolutionary model, and testing the most plausible ones and observing my own experience, in a sort of mad-scientist experimental-science way.

I didn't seek out this approach. On the contrary, it found me after I first tried following the advice and prescriptions of physicians, a certified nutritionist, other "experts" and consensus scientific views. I ended up with the mad scientist experiment and heuristics approach by default, resulting in such radical therapies as a mostly raw ancestral diet (considered bad or even insane by most scientists and "experts") and fermented and probiotic foods, because it's what actually worked for me after trying everything else.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 03:47:41 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #647 on: May 12, 2013, 09:09:50 pm »
Eggs, lemons and even pickled horseradish now taste sweet to me. Some scientists have hypothesized that this occurs when the brain connects the flavor of a strong-tasting food to some nutrients the brain has come to recognize via evolutionary adaptation as beneficial, such as carbs, fats, phytonutrients, vitamins and minerals. Another hypothesis is hormetic robustification to small amounts of toxins, such as the plant toxins/medicines in bitter plant foods like horseradish and other mustard/brassicaceae/crucifer veggies, dark leafy greens, bitter melon, cranberries, etc.  (ie, what doesn't kill me makes me stronger).

I bought some Farmers old fashioned prepared horseradish that includes mustard oil and is thus much spicier than regular pickled horseradish and tastes like the regular product used to taste to me. It very similar in strength to wasabi mustard, so it may make for a cheaper alternative to that for me, though it's too early to tell.

Interestingly, mustard oil is used in ayurvedic medicine and is similar to Lorenzo's oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mustard_oil), though the benefits of Lorenzo's oil could be due to the hormetic effect of small amounts of toxins, and while mustard oil is much lower in omega 6 fats than other plant oils, it still contains more than omega 3 and is probably most often a heated and refined product, so I don't intend to consume large amounts of mustard oil.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 10:46:41 pm by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #648 on: May 19, 2013, 09:12:47 pm »
I think someone asked me a question about Brazil nut selenium content that I accidentally deleted prematurely. A single Brazil nut contains more than the recommended Daily Value of selenium, though I currently average more than one a day. They're also high in phytic acid and omega 6, so buyer beware. There's also plenty of info on Brazil nuts on the Internet that one can Google.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: PaleoPhil's Journal
« Reply #649 on: May 26, 2013, 06:37:50 am »
I created a yummy new drink concoction on a whim, containing some of my favorite ingredients: lemon juice, lime juice and Farmers' brand super-hot horseradish. Yum! Not for the faint of heart.  ;D
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

 

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