Author Topic: Lex's Journal  (Read 751414 times)

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Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1550 on: July 28, 2012, 06:59:48 am »
Thoth - Nuf said for now.  Only time will tell how well your beliefs and choices will serve you. 

Chris -  I'm pleased you've found something useful.  It is why I'm here - not to tell you what to do, but to tell you what I've done and the results, good and bad, so you can make your own informed decisions.

Lex

Offline wetroof

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1551 on: August 01, 2012, 09:47:11 am »
Lex, I admire your commitment to the diet.

I eat the pet-food from Marin-sun farms. the cost is 2.69 per lb! I learned about marin-sun farms from your journal.

I cook it though, and add onions, garlic and ginger powder, and red pepper because I never got around the smell/taste of it. And I put in about 1 ounce of butter and 1 ounce of tallow per lb.

the one thing I eat raw, is ground heart from marin-sun farms. that has a completely neutral taste, so i just heat it a bit and add butter and salt and pepper.

 I really dislike the smell and taste of tallow. I'm wondering if this is a certain genetic thing because I've heard varying opinions on the taste of tallow - and I just can't imagine anyone enjoying it.

On the guru topic, I have a favorite. Gurdjieff. my three favorite books are by gurdjieff or by his pupils. I read these in the last two years. Nothing I read previously can really compare to it.


Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1552 on: August 01, 2012, 10:31:53 am »
Wetroof,

Thanks for the kind words.  Yes, Marin Sun Farms are good people.  I wish they were closer as I would purchase from them in a heartbeat, but since I'm about 7 hours away and they won't ship, I have to limit my purchases to bulk items.  I usually purchase once a year from MSF and then I pool with others in my area and we get 300 to 500 lbs of meat and fat.  That makes the trip worth while and spreads the cost of gas.  The only bad thing is driving to SF and back in one day.  Makes a very long trip.

If you don't like tallow then by all means get fresh suet, chop it up and add it to your mix.  I love fresh suet and eat it often - way better than rendered tallow.  The only reason I render fat is for the pemmican I make to send as samples ( I send out about 100 lbs of samples per year), and rendered fat doesn't take up freezer space.  Fresh suet is always preferable.   I also do several demos on pemmican making per year and need some fresh suet to render in the demo, but a lot more rendered fat so that each person can make some pemmican to take home.  Just no way 20 people can render fat all at once so I just render a small amount to show how it is done and use my pre-rendered tallow for everything else.

Now that Slankers can again provide enough suet to meet my needs (most of the time), I eat mostly fresh suet with my meals and save the rendered stuff for when I run out of fresh suet, or Slankers runs out and I have to make do.  Last time I purchased fresh suet from MSF it was less than $1.50/lb.  Much cheaper than Slankers, but then again, MSF won't ship.

I haven't tried MSF pet food but those that have tell me it is very good.  Most like it better than Slankers.

A suggestion for cooking your meals:  Warm your meat mixture (add your fresh ground/chopped suet to the mix) until it is a little warmer than room temperature.  I do this in the microwave about 20 seconds at a time stirring in between until the suet I've mixed in starts to become soft and pasty but the nothing is actually cooked - it's just lukewarm.  Spread your warm meat mixture in a pie pan or similar container so that it is about 1/2" thick.  Sprinkle with salt, pepper, garlic pwd etc, top with your melted butter.  Then place under the broiler for about 60 seconds give or take.  This will mimic a rare cooked steak.  You'll get a thin cooked layer on top with the raw/rare stuff underneath.  I've found that people who just can't eat totally raw mix actually enjoy it prepared this way.  You can vary the time under the broiler to make the cooked layer as thick or thin as you wish.  Try it, I think you'll like it.  It's a great way to transistion from fully cooked to mostly raw.

Lex
« Last Edit: August 01, 2012, 10:55:50 am by lex_rooker »

Offline Joy2012

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1553 on: August 01, 2012, 06:46:39 pm »
  I'm eating pretty close to the way you are, so if you think that is working for you, imagine how much better it will work for someone who has started at such a young age. I was very sickly as a child, lots of colds, flus, stomach aches, then later terrible infections mostly above the shoulders, fatigue, depression, etc. Now I haven't been to the doctor or dentist in 5 yrs, I'm stronger, healthier and happier than I've ever been in my life and I have the signs to show for it, teeth remineralizing, shiny hair, supple skin and of course, plenty of energy work here on the farm and a couple other 'jobs'. The only difference is that I'm honoring the fact that plants are a natural part of most human diets.

Did you talk about the details of your diet in another post? I would like to read it.

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1554 on: August 02, 2012, 01:01:32 am »
Joy,
My whole journal is about the details of what I eat, why I eat the way I do, and the long term measurable effects through my annual lab tests as well as short term measurments I can make like Blood Glucose and Blood Ketone levels.  I've been eating much the same way for about 8 years now.  I suggest you start at the beginning of my journal and work forward.  In a very short time I expect that most of your questions will be answered.

If, after you've read my journal, you have specific questions that you would like more detail on, feel free to ask.

Lex

Offline Joy2012

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1555 on: August 02, 2012, 01:43:37 am »
Lex, I have read your entire journal--almost every post--upon the recommendation of many members on this forum, and I have benefited much from my reading. Thank you very much for sharing your experience.

My previous post was addresssed to Thoth. I am interested in knowing how he has incorporated plant foods into his RP diet. I do not want to take up space in your journal to talk about another member's diet, so I asked him if he could refer me to another thread which talked about his RP diet.

Thank you for your kindness in writing me a reply, though. :)

Offline wetroof

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1556 on: August 02, 2012, 03:07:45 pm »
Okay Lex, I'm going to try suet again, as soon as I can get some. It's pretty awful in the initial stages of rendering, but who knows... probably much better than tallow, but that isn't really saying much.

I did have some smoked suet once. that was actually alright but it was smoked pretty well in terms of flavor.

I guess the reason I use tallow is because it is a rendered fat, and it can melt and mix in with the other flavors. Also, when I first started rendering I had in mind eating cooked meat - but now I really don't have much of preference.

I do my own rendering so it would be awesome to quit that. And I have a large amount left, but it doesn't expire, so that's fine.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2012, 03:26:12 pm by wetroof »

Offline Dorothy

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1557 on: August 03, 2012, 03:10:22 am »
I like frozen suet sliced thinly while still frozen and then refrozen in the easy to grab slices from a glass container. I just put a slice in my mouth as is and I think it's yummy - when I want/need fat that is. Nice and chewy. All my pets also love this - especially the chickens.

One day I have to take a picture of all of us animals (chickens, cats, dogs and humans) "chewing the fat" together. :)

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1558 on: August 19, 2012, 10:28:48 am »
In Phinney’s and Volek’s book “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance”, they discuss the science behind the necessity of including salt in a VLC/ZC diet.  I came to the conclusion that salt was necessary several years ago when I was suffering from night time leg cramps after being VLC/ZC for 18 to 24 months, but had nothing but my own experience to back it up.  (There are several entries about this early in my journal.)  Anyway, I’ve included a couple of grams of salt in my diet each day ever since and had no further problems, and Phinny/Volek have confirmed the wisdom of this practice with the science.

Phinney and Volek also suggest drinking a cup or two of beef or chicken broth everyday made from bouillon cubes or bouillon concentrate as a pleasant way to consume the extra sodium needed when following a VLC/ZC diet.  I decided to try this and did indeed find it a nice way to start the day.  Others have a cup of coffee and I have a cup of broth which also helps fit in socially.  I did find that most bouillon products are loaded with MSG but found a product called “Better Than Bouillon” that has no MSG and is made from meat rather than the usual mix of chemicals and flavorings.  It comes in glass jars and is a thick granular paste filled with small bits of meat.  Yes, it’s cooked, but is probably a minor sin compared to what most people consume.  Swanson’s Flavor Boost concentrate packet’s also seem to be a good choice but are much more expensive per serving.  I might consider these for convenience when traveling. 

I also recently ran across David Asprey’s BulletProof Coffee where he whips in a couple of ounces of grass-fed butter into his daily cup-o-joe.  I intensely dislike coffee, and try to avoid caffeine, but decided to try this with my morning broth.  It’s great!  David uses unsalted butter in his coffee, but I use the salted type because my whole reason for consuming the broth is to increase my salt intake.  I use KerryGold butter which is pretty expensive at $8 USD/lb (1/2 kilo), but seems to be very high quality and tastes wonderful.

Here’s how I make my morning drink:
I heat 10 oz (300ml) of water until very hot but not boiling and put it in a 16 oz (500ml) cup.

Next I add 1 rounded teaspoon (5 ml) of either the beef or chicken Better Than Bouillon paste, and 2 oz (56g) of KerryGold butter.  (I don’t melt the butter but just put in a ½ of a quarter lb stick just as it comes from the refrigerator)

I then mix everything with an immersion blender which makes a very smooth rich and buttery drink with a nice froth on top. 

This drink only has 1 carb (from the label on the bouillon jar) and 56g of fat. Calculates out to a bit over 450 calories per serving.  With KerryGold butter at $8/lb and I get 8 servings out of a lb of butter, and about 15 cents for the bouillon paste,  my cost is about $1.15/1.20 USD per serving. 

Lex

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1559 on: August 20, 2012, 01:19:29 am »
Glad to hear of your success with salt supplementation, Lex. I researched salt some time ago and found that carnivores that consume fresh raw meat and blood from animals with sufficient salt levels don't need to supplement their diet with salt licks or springs:
"Wild herbivores, like deer, who eat a completely plant-based diet, have to supplement their diet with salt to get the sodium they need. These animals find salt in brine springs, or in natural outcroppings of salty rock, called salt licks. Wild carnivores, or animals that eat only meat, do not have to eat salt. Their sodium needs are met through the flesh and blood that they eat." taken from:-   http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/HumBio_p026.shtml

So humans that ate like carnivores probably didn't need much, if any, salt supplementation when wild game was plentiful. But as consumption of fresh, raw, salt-rich blood and bloody meat declined (including the modern practice in some nations like the USA of bleeding all meats) and mineral-depleting cereal grain intake increased, humans reportedly had to supplement their diets with more and more added salt:
"The history of the world according to salt is simple: animals wore paths to salt licks; men followed; trails became roads, and settlements grew beside them. When the human menu shifted from salt-rich game to cereals, more salt was needed to supplement the diet. But the underground deposits were beyond reach, and the salt sprinkled over the surface was insufficient. Scarcity kept the mineral precious. As civilization spread, salt became one of the world's principal trading commodities." (A Brief History of Salt, Monday, Mar. 15, 1982)

The modern Western tendency to not eat blood, organs and cartilage may contribute to deficiencies in sodium and other nutrients: "It is the bones, blood, cartilage, etc. that contain many of the minerals that are needed by carnivorous animals. Humans who eat only the flesh of animals thus receive a diet very poor in sodium, calcium, sulfur, magnesium and iron." (Lesson 10 - The Role Of Minerals In Human Nutrition > 4. Mineral Deficiencies, http://www.rawfoodexplained.com/minerals/mineral-deficiencies.html)

Research reveals a J/U-shaped curve that suggests health benefits from moderate salt consumption. (Salt and our Health, By Morton Satin, PhD,
March 26 2012, http://www.westonaprice.org/vitamins-and-minerals/salt-and-our-health)

Excessive restriction of salt may pose dangers: http://www.westonaprice.org/press/fda-warned-dangers-salt-restriction.

Years ago my father was in Paris and greatly enjoyed the coq au vin he had been served at a gourmet restaurant. When he asked why the chef's coq au vin was so much richer, darker and tastier than American versions, the chef explained that the difference was that Americans bleed out their chickens and discard the blood, whereas the French didn't bleed them (and reserved and used the extra blood that did bleed out on its own--which is a tradition still practiced in France today, according to Clifford A. Wright in The Best Stews in the World: 300 Satisfying One-Dish Dinners, from Chilis and Gumbos to Curries and Cassoulet, 2012). Also, because American chefs don't thicken the stew with blood, they tend to use a roux that contains wheat flour to thicken it, which further depletes the body of iron, sodium and other minerals.

Here, Nenets add even more salt, lots of it, to fresh raw blood, to keep it liquid in the cold (and maybe also for taste or health benefit?):
Bruce Parry eats raw reindeer - Tribe - BBC
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1560 on: August 20, 2012, 01:09:47 pm »
Phil,
I'm in full agreement with your post.  If I were able to reasonably get enough blood to add to my daily diet then supplementing with broth or extra salt would not be necessary.  Unfortunately fresh blood is difficult to find, and at this time and place in history it is not high on the list of socially acceptable foods.

I must live and get along in this modern world and I have chosen to compromise with broth and added salt to make my lifestyle easier for me to follow and less burdensome to friends, coworkers, and family who must regularly interact with me.  I stress the word "chosen" as it clearly is a choice and not something I'm forced into.  I certainly could spend my time searching out sources and disregard the feelings of those around me, but I feel the added benefit would be trivial in comparison to the drawbacks both in time and the social discomfort caused to others around me.

Lex

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1561 on: August 21, 2012, 05:23:26 am »
Unfortunately fresh blood is difficult to find, and at this time and place in history it is not high on the list of socially acceptable foods.
Yup and I supplement with some (unheated) sea salt and Great Lakes Gelatin myself. The impossibility of eating exactly like our Paleolithic ancestors in every way and the fact that raw Paleo doesn't cure all of everyone's pre-existing issues overnight makes absolute prohibitions for all against foodlements (supplements that are as close to foods as possible) unreasonable.

It would be nice if Americans would start to follow the example of France, Britain and even early American colonists and return blood to the cuisine, though. My local market briefly sold some English blood pudding but it unfortunately contained wheat. American cuisine has actually made some amazing strides in re-introducing some old foods in my lifetime. For example, in my youth in this dairy state, the only "cheeses" I saw were "American cheese," which was a product made usually from vegetable oil, Swiss cheese, provalone, and very mild to moderately sharp cheddar, all pasteurized. Now there are countless cheeses, including many raw ones.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1562 on: August 21, 2012, 07:13:09 am »
Things have changed dramatically in my lifetime as well.  Most of the changes are neither good nor bad - things are just different.   I can say that we had far more personal freedom when I was a kid and I mourn the loss.

Lex

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1563 on: August 21, 2012, 08:45:43 am »
Oh sure, and I was tempted to also write about the increase in junk foods to balance out what I wrote about the return of some traditional foods, but I didn't want to go too far on a tangent on your journal. :) Every year thousands of newly invented food products are introduced and we could probably do well without any of them. Luckily, most of them don't survive long and the world is not nearly as wildly different as the futurists predicted decades ago that it would become.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2012, 08:52:09 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1564 on: August 21, 2012, 12:20:19 pm »
Every year thousands of newly invented food products are introduced and we could probably do well without any of them.
The same goes for new laws.
Luckily, most of them don't survive long and the world is not nearly as wildly different as the futurists predicted decades ago that it would become.

 Unfortunatley laws are not market driven and tend to last forever.  They are seldom repealed no matter how silly or oppressive.

As for new foods, I'm still waiting for the perfect nutrition "two pills and a glass of water and you're good for the day" meal which was expected as a by-product of the space race in the 1960s.  What we got instead was Tang orange flavored drink powder and the computer revolution.  Depending on your point of view each of these could be considered a blessing or a curse.

Lex

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1565 on: September 04, 2012, 05:37:39 am »
Lex, what is your take on the UCAN SuperStarch that Phinney and Volek have been advocating?

On the blood, organs, cartilage, bones and skin front (all foods that were part of Paleolithic diets that are not easy to eat in quantity today on a 100% raw Paleo diet, and made more easy to consume with some low-slow moist cooking, such as in a crockpot), since adding bone/joint/skin/etc. broths, Great Lakes Gelatin, and coconut meat to my diet, and adding back more raw eggs and suet, plus cutting down some on the recent increase in carby foods, my dental health has improved further. My dental hygienist said my gums and my dental carie of some 4 or 5 years are improved. I've noticed that the more I emphasize these elements, the more my teeth feel like they've just been polished by the dental hygienist--squeaky clean and smooth and pleasant to the tongue, just like in that old "Pearl Drops" ad.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Inger

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1566 on: September 04, 2012, 07:34:24 pm »

As for new foods, I'm still waiting for the perfect nutrition "two pills and a glass of water and you're good for the day" meal which was expected as a by-product of the space race in the 1960s.  What we got instead was Tang orange flavored drink powder and the computer revolution. 

Lex. I think I found it. These "perfect nutrition pills" you are speaking of. Don't laugh now, but that must be fishheads.
Fish heads, raw. Maybe pureed in a blender with water to a smoothie. I do this regularly and I can tell you it is almost... magic. If you start searching the nutrients in a fishhead.. you will get amazed. You can often get them for free too. The fish eyes are delicious to eat pure, tastes a bit like roe to me.
Now you can puree the whole raw fish too and choke it down. You should try it Lex.

@ Paleophil,
I love how you look at food.. it so similar to my view too. My teeth's are also in great shape now! It must be all the minerals in seafood too..

Offline Alive

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1567 on: September 05, 2012, 04:01:55 pm »
Thank you Inger,
I have just tried your fish head smoothie idea with some fermented greens, and the taste was OK :) The blue cod heads cost 50 cents each.
I would like to try freezing some, keep some in the fridge, and hanging in a cool place to compare results. Anything that could improve digestion and maybe reduce the wear and tear on the blender would be good!
Jason, our fish wholesaler, has agreed to collect & freeze 7 small bags of fish livers and kidneys a week. Everyone is saying good things about organ meats, and here we are mineral depleted in selenium and iodine so sea food is a plus. Jason is doing this for the labour cost, since normally they just bin the guts.
As it has been reported that broccoli RNA can continue to function in our blood stream, it seems reasonable to assume that raw liver and kidney would continue to perform some of their detox functions, and provide the ideal nutrients for the consumers own organs.
1 serving of raw kidney has 30% RDA of Vitamin C, 1 serving of cooked kidney has 0% etc etc = sounds sensible.

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1568 on: September 06, 2012, 11:30:44 pm »
Lex, what is your take on the UCAN SuperStarch that Phinney and Volek have been advocating?

Stuff like this comes along all the time.  Remember when aspartame was hailed as a new revolutionary ultra low calorie sweetener made from "natural" modified proteins?  Now it is linked to all kinds of problems.  Since there is no evidence that UCAN SuperStarch can be hunted or gathered, and significant evidence that it comes from a modern chemical factory I think I'll avoid it.

... just like in that old "Pearl Drops" ad.

Now you are dating yourself.  I remember those ads and actually used Pearl Drops back in the 70's.  Gave it up after it was clear that it was eroding the enamel off my teeth.

As for all the connective tissue and other stuff you are describing, I get lots of that in the pet food.  It's filled with chunks and chewy bits as well as the occasional bone shard - great stuff.

Lex
« Last Edit: September 07, 2012, 02:33:10 am by TylerDurden »

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1569 on: September 07, 2012, 12:06:40 am »
Inger,
I'm not a real fan of fish.  I don't find fish very satisfying.  For me, it's a bit like the old joke about Chinese food: eat until you are stuffed and two hours later you're hungry.  Just doesn't work well when eating only once a day.  If I eat a meal of fish I can eat until I just can't hold anymore and within 3 or 4 hours I'm hungry again.  When I eat red meat I can eat one meal until satisfied and I'm not hungry again until the next day.

Fish is very high in polyunsaturated fatty acids and very low in saturated fatty acids.  There is some evidence that large amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids can cause problems over time and that saturated fatty acids are a better fuel source for our bodies.  In other words, the fatty acid profile of fish is not optimal for humans.  Best evidence seems to show that humans evolved eating terrestrial red meat animals as our primary food source and that the fatty acid profile of grass-eating red meat animals is optimum for us.

I've done very well eating grass-eating red meat animals and my experience eating fish has not been all that great.  I do eat fish on occasion (once or twice a year), normally when eating out, but it does not make up a significant part of my diet.  Fish heads may be more nutritious than the muscle meat of the fish but the same can be said for eating the organs of red meat animals.  Unfortunately, fish heads still have the same poor fatty acid profile as the whole fish and therefore I will not make fish a significant part of my diet.  I don't hate fish, but I will always choose red meat over fish if it is available.  Fish is my food of last resort.

When faced with a choice I choose food in the following order:

Red meat grass-fed animals first
Red meat grain finished animals next
Pork next
Poultry next
Fish and eggs last

Lex
« Last Edit: September 07, 2012, 12:14:58 am by lex_rooker »

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1570 on: September 07, 2012, 02:34:13 am »
*Corrected one of the above posts for 1 spelling mistake*
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline Chris

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1571 on: September 07, 2012, 02:57:07 am »
When faced with a choice I choose food in the following order:

Red meat grass-fed animals first
Red meat grain finished animals next
Pork next
Poultry next
Fish and eggs last

I agree with you on fish. I find it very unsatisfactory as far as curbing my appetite. I tend to eat a lot of it, when I do (which is very rare these days). But, it doesn't satisfy like you said. It digests way too fast for me at least. I find I have the same results with eggs. Poultry, doesn't have any interest with me due to the lack of quality pasture raised meat. Plus, it doesn't have the same nutrient profile as pasture raised red meat. So why bother. I haven't had pork yet. I haven't found any that are true pasture raised (fresh). I know I can find them online. But, I don't know if it's worth the bother to be quite honest with you.
I was a little surprised that you ranked grain finished meat second. I guess that show's how little interest you have with the following choices. I'm sure it would only be an option, if you had a limited supply of grass fed beef. Would that be the same for organ meat's also? I agree with you about keeping  things simple. I'm actually been 95+% Carnivore for going on three month's now. I seem to be getting stronger and stronger so far, and it's kept my appetite in check. I'm not too technical as some of the others on this site with keeping track of percentages. But, my body seems to function better with a high intake of animal fats. I try to get everything as fresh as I can. I'm currently avoiding frozen meats for now. What's your viewpoint on fresh vs. frozen? I read something on the site a about the advantages of fresh meats over frozen. I'm curious on what your intake or views are on the subject.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2012, 03:36:32 am by Chris »

Offline Alive

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1572 on: September 07, 2012, 05:20:36 am »
@Tyler - do we really care if you have corrected spelling - if you really feel the need to bother why post about it?

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1573 on: September 07, 2012, 06:28:04 am »
Since there is no evidence that UCAN SuperStarch can be hunted or gathered, and significant evidence that it comes from a modern chemical factory I think I'll avoid it.
I figured you would have something sensible to say about it.

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Now you are dating yourself.  I remember those ads and actually used Pearl Drops back in the 70's.  Gave it up after it was clear that it was eroding the enamel off my teeth.
Maybe that's why the lady in the advertisement was licking her teeth and saying "Mmmmm"--she was enjoying consuming her own teeth. ;)

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As for all the connective tissue and other stuff you are describing, I get lots of that in the pet food.  It's filled with chunks and chewy bits as well as the occasional bone shard - great stuff.
Thanks for the tip.

I find I enjoy raw fermented mint cod liver oil and stink fish quite a bit now, and I like it more and more the longer I eat it. The more rotted the fish, the better, as far as I'm concerned, though I still don't have a taste for Asian fermented fish sauce--what the Romans called garum and the English Worcestershire sauce (the modern variant is a pale imitation)--for some reason. One problem is, the true fermented Asian version I tried is too salty for me.

Stink fish/oil gives me this lovely burning sensation in my throat that's not really burning--it's impossible to describe. An Eskimo once asked a European something along the lines of "Why do you Kabloonak like stink cheese but not stink fish?" Well, here's a Kabloonak who does. The Eskimo fellow was a bit off the mark, though--some Swedes apparently still like Surströmming. Must try that some day.

The downside of stinkfish is, the other day I forgot that it smells very strong to most people and 99.99% of Americans can't stand the smell of it and I grossed out some visitors by stinking up my home before they arrived. Smells good to me--very mild. LOL

Satya also warned me that fermented seafood/oils contain too much oxidized PUFAs. I figure that an excess might be a problem, but I seem to be faring well on what I consider a reasonable amount. I guess I can be a guinea pig for you more sensible folk. If the stinkfish/oil, fish head/bone broths, sashimi and other fish I eat kills me, I'll let you and Ray Peat know.  ;) So far all I notice is improved dental health, a mild sense of wellbeing, and less constipation since including more of the seafoods I mentioned and less ground beef. I'm not claiming that stinkfish is a superfood or anything and wouldn't want anyone doing something just because I seem to be benefiting from it. Who knows, I may discover negative side effects down the road from evil PUFAs and maybe they're why Stefansson thought that the Inuits aged rapidly.

Thanks for the tip, Inger. You're brilliant as well as beautiful. The seafood manager is going to include some free salmon heads and bones in my next order.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2012, 07:03:05 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #1574 on: September 07, 2012, 12:07:55 pm »
I was a little surprised that you ranked grain finished meat second. I guess that shows how little interest you have with the following choices. I'm sure it would only be an option, if you had a limited supply of grass fed beef. Would that be the same for organ meat's also?

I've found that red meat and fat from red meat animals beats all other meat sources.  I'll eat other meats on occasion if that's all that is available, but for me, red meat is king - even if I have to occasionally settle for grain-finished.

But, my body seems to function better with a high intake of animal fats.

My experience is exactly the same.  As long as most of the fat I eat is from red meat grass-fed animals I do very well.

I try to get everything as fresh as I can. I'm currently avoiding frozen meats for now. What's your viewpoint on fresh vs. frozen? I read something on the site a about the advantages of fresh meats over frozen. I'm curious on what your intake or views are on the subject. 

All my meat comes frozen.  I find it convenient for storage and can detect no difference as far as my body's ability to process and digest frozen meat vs fresh meat.  That's just my experience.  Others on this forum appear to be more sensitive and have a different take on the subject.  All I can suggest is that you give frozen meat a try and come to your own conclusions.

Lex

 

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