Author Topic: Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?  (Read 5615 times)

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Offline TylerDurden

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Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?
« on: November 17, 2011, 03:43:50 pm »
Nutrition, evolution and thyroid hormone levels - a link to iodine deficiency disorders?
Kopp W.
Source

Diagnostikzentrum Graz, Mariatrosterstrasse 41, 8043 Graz, Austria. wk@dzg.at
Abstract

An increased iodine requirement as a result of significant changes in human nutrition rather than a decreased environmental iodine supply is suggested to represent the main cause of the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). The pathomechanism proposed is based on the fact that serum concentrations of thyroid hormones, especially of trijodothyronine (T3), are dependent on the amount of dietary carbohydrate. High-carbohydrate diets are associated with significantly higher serum T3 concentrations, compared with very low-carbohydrate diets. While our Paleolithic ancestors subsisted on a very low carbohydrate/high protein diet, the agricultural revolution about 10,000 years ago brought about a significant increase in dietary carbohydrate. These nutritional changes have increased T3 levels significantly. Higher T3 levels are associated with an enhanced T3 production and an increased iodine requirement. The higher iodine requirement exceeds the availability of iodine from environmental sources in many regions of the world, resulting in the development of IDD.

taken from:-

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15142639
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Offline Löwenherz

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Re: Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2011, 05:01:29 pm »
That's VERY interesting, really! Thank you for this article. Doctors, which I visit extremely rarely, always tell me that my blood T3 levels are "a little bit" too low. And I eat much more fish and seafood than most people here. Now I have the answer.

Grains and sugars are nothing more than a big disaster. I wish I knew this decades ago..

Löwenherz
« Last Edit: November 17, 2011, 05:12:38 pm by Löwenherz »

Offline Ferocious

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Re: Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2011, 06:00:06 pm »
That's VERY interesting, really! Thank you for this article. Doctors, which I visit extremely rarely, always tell me that my blood T3 levels are "a little bit" too low. And I eat much more fish and seafood than most people here. Now I have the answer.

Grains and sugars are nothing more than a big disaster. I wish I knew this decades ago..

Löwenherz

But a little bit too low according to what?

Offline achillezzz

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Re: Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 02:53:44 am »
To the medical nazis standards..

Anyway certain amount of carbohydrates has to do some good for us we still have plain evidence that the liver converts proteins to glucose so if we have a quiet stable supply of nutritious carbohydrates like tubers(THE LIVER OF THE PLANTS) or some low fructose fruits we could  take some stress of the liver because gluconeogenesis creates acidity and other byproducts?
« Last Edit: November 18, 2011, 05:08:04 am by TylerDurden »

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2011, 10:46:19 am »
I've seen a blogger and/or lecturer somewhere report that low T3 is normal for low carbers, but that most physicians and patients don't know this, so they tend freak out. I think it might have been Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt of Sweden.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline prowler

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Re: Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2011, 07:31:00 pm »
we still have plain evidence that the liver converts proteins to glucose

It would be great to finally find out whether the whole input protein got converted at the rate of 58% or just excess of it. Different sources speak different things.

Offline sabertooth

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Re: Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2011, 09:54:21 pm »
I had some kind of atypical diabetes where my blood sugars would raise after eating anything. I also had liver issues, it seems that my liver would produce sugar even while I slept. I would eat a small vegetable plate at night and by the time I would go to bed my blood sugar would usually drop down to 100, but then when I woke up in the morning it would jump to 115 even after fasting for 12 hours. During that period I had real bad liver and pancreatic pain and some type of systemic yeast overgrowth.

I believe my liver was damaged in a way that made it produce too much sugar, and it could be behind the reason I have taken so well to ZC, while many others have a bad experience with ZC transition.During my adaption my damaged liver kept making glucose, so I could more easily live without eating very many carbs. Eventually my sugars quit spiking and all the gut pain and yeast overgrowth disappeared, after about the first month on the diet.

I cant be the only one with this type of mutant physiology.
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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Zero-Carb Scientific Endorsement?
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2011, 11:29:32 pm »
I had some kind of atypical diabetes where my blood sugars would raise after eating anything. I also had liver issues, it seems that my liver would produce sugar even while I slept. I would eat a small vegetable plate at night and by the time I would go to bed my blood sugar would usually drop down to 100, but then when I woke up in the morning it would jump to 115 even after fasting for 12 hours. During that period I had real bad liver and pancreatic pain and some type of systemic yeast overgrowth.

I believe my liver was damaged in a way that made it produce too much sugar, and it could be behind the reason I have taken so well to ZC, while many others have a bad experience with ZC transition.During my adaption my damaged liver kept making glucose, so I could more easily live without eating very many carbs. Eventually my sugars quit spiking and all the gut pain and yeast overgrowth disappeared, after about the first month on the diet.


It sounds like you're one of the people who probably can do fine on ZC for a long time.  When you hit 30 you might want to get your lipid profile blood work done every year, just to keep an eye on that.  Also make sure you're drinking plenty of water, Lex Rooker got  kidney stones b/c he wasn't having enough water every day on ZC.  Otherwise, rock on. 

 

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