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91
Can't answer your question but I can give you my opinion and an interesting story. Whenever eggs have a close date they go on sale really cheap at the supermarket. Not too long ago I bought 12 dozen for fifty cents a dozen. I have no hesitation at all keeping eggs three or four months past their expiration date. When I was a kid my dad would take me to bars with him. Back then it was OK to do that kind of thing. There was a basket with hard boiled eggs sitting on the counter and I never saw anyone ever eat one for the whole time I was growing up... My dad lied to me and told me they were for decoration. One day a guy walked in and bought one, cracked it on the counter and ate it. I have no idea how old it was but I imagine it wasn't too far off from being a dinosaur egg! After the man left I began talking about it with my dad. The bartender overheard us and told me that he had just made those eggs this morning but I knew he was lying!
92
Hey all, fairly new to the forum and the diet and have been having success with the raw eggs so far.  I was wondering if refrigerated store bought eggs (preferably pastured) get better or worse with time?  Once they begin approaching and surpassing the best before date and begin getting slimier, does this even matter?  I'm still a little confused as to how the whole bacteria thing works now but am trying to learn.  Thanks!
94
Health / Re: What is the best way to permanently conquer candida overgrowth?
« Last post by van on August 05, 2018, 01:57:30 pm »
the term dissonance applies here.  Too often we cannot test for truth when we are so steeped in our individual and social ways.  The mind cannot even see the doorknob, let alone reach for it.
95
Health / Re: What is the best way to permanently conquer candida overgrowth?
« Last post by sabertooth on August 05, 2018, 12:39:19 pm »
The profoundest of speculations often lead to most profound discoveries, when they aren't leading the entire world astray...I would say it seems a reasonable hypothesis regarding how the guts of vegetable consumers if functioning properly would develop protective symbiotic biofilms specifically designed to obtain optimal nourishment from the foodstuffs being consumed, while at the same time producing factors that would mitigate the detrimental effects of decaying and indigestible fiber. Perhaps many people who do better on the carnivore spectrum have lost the capacity to form healthy protective vegetable loving biofilms, while those struggling with attempts to adapt to a more carnivorous diet are being hindered by a gut biome still holding on to its vegetable armory coating.... In the next few years many of these questions will likely be systematically studied in greater detail than ever before.

Until then...much of what I claim here is based on personal intuition and broad sweeping deductions.....I have found no bona fide arbiter of truth, who is following along these lines of inquiry, to my liking......I've read some of the mainstream literature and it seems a number of breakthroughs in this field are right on the horizon.....such as how its been known that genes transfer between separate species within biofilms...but the language used to describe these processes of gene learning, is lacking in depth of expression or greater meaning, and does not communicate the true magnitude of what is actually happening on all levels of biological life. The top researchers on this cutting edge seem in many ways hamstrung by misconceptions stemming from the mercky origins of Germ Theory, combine with darwin's random mutation notions and are not viewing these complex phenomenon through the lense of lamarckian epigenetics.

Though much of this is fascinating to ponder over and gawk upon, I still question the utility of these fields of study in producing results which would be of actual help to people alive today. Sure they may eventually get around to studying the gut composition of raw meat eaters, but even if they genetically map out all the gut organisms that make meat based diet adaption viable, and can prove there is merit in following this kind of diet for certain people, it still remains to be seen what would be done by the lab coats in charge. Will they see the error of their ways, do a 180 turnabout and convert the entire establishment over into a more earth centered biologically holistic system, or will the thiefdoms fight amongst themselves over the patent rights so that they can continue to concoct even more absurdly artificiously contrived ways of prescribing profit driven ineffectual forms of medical intervention.
96
Health / Re: What is the best way to permanently conquer candida overgrowth?
« Last post by van on August 05, 2018, 03:35:47 am »
I would also add that what is ubiquitously called yeast overgrowth is a blanket term that covers a wide array of conditions of which yeast is often only a component within a larger biofilm composed of a pathogenic symbiosis of highly resistant mycoplasma, yeast, and bacteria. Years of antibiotic, antifungal, anti viral vaccines have catalyzed an evolution of pathogenic resistance and stealth infections which evade traditional detection methods.   

Bacteria and fungus are forming more elaborate and intricate symbiotic relationships in response to modern efforts to force elimination with weapons of bio-mass-destruction. They protect each other and are hidden within biofilms which are not detectable using standard test, they share biocide resistance through genetic transference, and continue to perform their biological balancing act regardless of the misguided efforts of the stringent allopathic biochemical interference.

Simply trying to starve out the yeast by going zero carb will not work when the yeast is embedded within a biofilm of bacteria that can convert fatty acids into sugar. The real reason low carb diets have positive effects against yeast overgrowth is that they eliminate foods that directly feed yeast while at the same time, ketogenesis increases the power of the mitochondria to revitalize the metabolism and immune system so that it more efficiently burns energy and clears away waste, so that interic environment no longer is capable of harboring yeast overgrowth.

seems like a little bit of speculation there at the end.. Would appreciate seeing the source of that info.   Regardless, you can witness the immediate response in the mouth when removing any real form of carbs.  And as long as we're possibly speculating, my guess is there are biofilms and there are biofilms.  Each created as a resultant from several if not many factors. And again, one very likely biofilm is the one that is created to protect the large intestinal wall lining from the caustic acids produced by fermenting vegetation.  Remove the vegetation and my guess is you will also create a different biofilm or possibly none at all.  That is my most curious question. I'm waiting for that study. But imagine it will be far down the line, as who is going to study the intestinal wall of a raw zero carb eater?   Imagining that cooked or especially charred meat and fat will create obnoxious elements that the intestine will want to protect itself from in one way or another.
97
Health / Re: What is the best way to permanently conquer candida overgrowth?
« Last post by sabertooth on August 05, 2018, 02:20:57 am »

Question to Sabretooth: at what time did you gain weight again? how far into the diet? I've just went from 70 to 76 kg in a couple of days but it could also just be due to the fact I've been with my parents eating shit here and there.

I began gaining weight right away....being emaciated from vegetarian experimentation prior to becoming raw paleo gaining weight was easy when eating two pounds of fatty meat every day. I gained around 30 pounds within three months before stabilizing around 175.
98
Health / Re: What is the best way to permanently conquer candida overgrowth?
« Last post by sabertooth on August 05, 2018, 02:11:26 am »
I would also add that what is ubiquitously called yeast overgrowth is a blanket term that covers a wide array of conditions of which yeast is often only a component within a larger biofilm composed of a pathogenic symbiosis of highly resistant mycoplasma, yeast, and bacteria. Years of antibiotic, antifungal, anti viral vaccines have catalyzed an evolution of pathogenic resistance and stealth infections which evade traditional detection methods.   

Bacteria and fungus are forming more elaborate and intricate symbiotic relationships in response to modern efforts to force elimination with weapons of bio-mass-destruction. They protect each other and are hidden within biofilms which are not detectable using standard test, they share biocide resistance through genetic transference, and continue to perform their biological balancing act regardless of the misguided efforts of the stringent allopathic biochemical interference.

Simply trying to starve out the yeast by going zero carb will not work when the yeast is embedded within a biofilm of bacteria that can convert fatty acids into sugar. The real reason low carb diets have positive effects against yeast overgrowth is that they eliminate foods that directly feed yeast while at the same time, ketogenesis increases the power of the mitochondria to revitalize the metabolism and immune system so that it more efficiently burns energy and clears away waste, so that interic environment no longer is capable of harboring yeast overgrowth.
99
Health / Re: What is the best way to permanently conquer candida overgrowth?
« Last post by van on August 05, 2018, 01:49:43 am »
the jury is still out on what a gut biome would be for a long time zero carb carnivore.  Or in other words, when we think about rebuilding it with a healthy bio, what really is going on there?   Does meat and fat support candida at all?  Or any of the other yeasts and fungi and fermentation that cause intestinal permeability,  which are like little harbors for more of the same.  And how much of our immune system is working overtime dealing with a leaky gut full of pathogens?   It's been recently questioned as to whether these 'healthy' fatty acids produced by the fermentation process of prebiotic foodstuffs can actually offset the damage done by the waste material ( acidic ) excreted by these fatty acid producing bacteria.    So much to discover. 
100
General Discussion / Re: Pasteurised dairy - bad habit?
« Last post by TylerDurden on August 05, 2018, 01:20:28 am »
*I feel like weeping*  ??? :o >: :(    . I once bought raw liquid honey, stored in jars, in the UK. The toxic stuff caused me to have awful blood-sugar-related-problems that I only otherwise encountered when using salt in more than tiny amounts. Later on, I found out that UK government regulations allowed raw UK honey/honeycomb to be labelled as being "raw", so long as the honey was "only" heated up to 80 degrees Celsius for a "short while".

In other words, avoid dairy however raw, if you have any brains. Even so, I myself managed to easily check, via the Internet(while in the UK in London), endless numerous sources of raw dairy(not necessarily absolutely ALL types of raw dairy), and was able to buy them very cheaply indeed( as of 2010, 2 pounds 50 sterling for 1 litre of raw milk etc.).
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